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Looking Toward the Future

A Comprehensive Perspective of African American Male Youth

Jamal A. Cooks

Kirkland C. Vaughans and Warren Spielberg, eds. 2014. The Psychology of Black Boys and Adolescents. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger. 2 Volumes. 615 pp. ISBN 978-0-313-38198-0 (hb) 978-0-313-38199-7 (e-bk)

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"A Quick Sideways Look and Wild Grin"

Joyful Assemblages in Moments of Girlhood

Susanne Gannon, Kristina Gottschall and Catherine Camden Pratt

Through stories of young girls at play produced in a collective biography workshop we trace flows of desire and excesses of joy, and bring recent feminist work on positive affect into our analysis of girlhood becomings. Ringrose (2011, 2013) argues that the concept of the “affective assemblage“ brings together affect, embodiment, and relationality in powerful ways to enable a mapping of how desire moves through the social. She suggests that the affective capacities of assemblages can be “life affirming or life destroying“ (2011: 602). In this article we are interested in mapping flows of desire, moments of joy and possibility in moments of girlhood, and in the limitations and contingencies within these moments that shut down these possibilities. We suggest that the methodology of collective biography (Davies and Gannon 2006, 2009, 2013) offers potential for tracing the microparticulars of girlhood becomings.

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Back in Time Yet of His Time

Marty McFly as a 1980s Teenage Boy Role Model

Daniel Smith-Rowsey

argue that Back to the Future is under-contextualized as a film about a 1980s teenage boy. If, as Catherine Driscoll argues (2011) , every teen film is about becoming a citizen and a subject, and if we look to 1980s films to see how the post

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Melanie Kennedy and Natalie Coulter

As we were writing this introduction, our online news and social media feeds filled up with the image of a tween looking directly at us, smiling: as news circulated globally of the death by suicide of the 14-year-old Australian Amy “Dolly” Everett

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Paula Booke and Todd J. Wiebe

the search boxes commonly found embedded in websites as localised search engines for specific content looking for citations or links to original sources or data tracking down primary data sources to verify the accuracy of how they were presented in

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Sarah Hill

dismissal allows” (2015: 2). As all this argues, there is clearly a need to look beyond gendered discursive constructions of the selfie that position it as a vain, narcissistic, and trivial practice. I claim that this is particularly important in relation to

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“This Is My Story”

The Reclaiming of Girls’ Education Discourses in Malala Yousafzai’s Autobiography

Rosie Walters

she was, she herself describes doing the very opposite. For example, when asked by the US ambassador how old she was she “straightened [her] posture to look as tall as possible,” before adding a year onto her age in the hope that he would listen more

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Laura Louise Sarauw, Sintayehu Kassaye Alemu and Penny Welch

Macfarlane, B. (2017), Freedom to Learn: The Threat to Student Academic Freedom and Why It Needs to Be Reclaimed London: Routledge, 140 pp., ISBN 978-0-415-72916-1

P. Zgaga, U. Teichler, H. G. Schuetze and A. Wolter (eds) (2015), Higher Education Reform: Looking Back and Looking Forward Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 431 pp., ISBN 978-3-631-66275-5

D. Pecorari and P. Shaw (eds) (2019), Student Plagiarism in Higher Education: Reflections on Teaching Practice London: Routledge, 180 pp., ISBN 978-1-138-05516-2

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Michael Kokozos and Nora Gross

Deirdre Fishel (dir). 2012. The Boy Game. [videorecording]. [Harriman, NY]: New Day Films. Mind’s Eye Productions. 16 min.

Steven Brion-Meisels and Maura Clarke. The Boy Game: A Look at Bullying Through the Lens of Masculine Gender Norms. A Study Guide to Accompany the Film. N.d., PDF, 65 pp.

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Deepa Nair

The controversy over rewriting history textbooks in India in 2000 not only revealed the divergent renditions of collective memory but also evoked decades of contention over self-representation and cultural identity. This article explores these "multiple" renderings of a "singular" past and contends the formation of "historical identities" by arguing that divergent use of reason and interpretation leads to a layered and uid Indian identity leaving it open for contestation. By situating the case of the Mughal ruler Aurangzeb within the milieu from which textbook controversies emanate, the article suggests an alternative dimension for looking at the controversy—instead of the usual binary concept of "secular" versus "communal" history. At the root of the controversy is not merely politicization but also divergent perspectives of looking at the past and the resultant rethinking and reworking of dominant notions of it.