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Afterword

The Elsewhere beyond Religious Concerns

Annalisa Butticci and Amira Mittermaier

long history of travel accounts, or the long-standing desire to reach beyond the planetary horizon. The dream of a mission to Mars. Anything but the depressing here and now! At first sight, the Elsewhere is what is not here. It shares certain

Open access

Julián Antonio Moraga Riquelme, Leslie E. Sponsel, Katrien Pype, Diana Riboli, Ellen Lewin, Marina Pignatelli, Katherine Swancutt, Alejandra Carreño Calderón, Anastasios Panagiotopoulos, Sergio González Varela, Eugenia Roussou, Juan Javier Rivera Andía, Miho Ishii, Markus Balkenhol, and Marcelo González Gálvez

's historical account of the Christ Apostolic Church (CAC), arguably Nigeria's largest Pentecostal church, starts from the premise that Yoruba women's desire to become mothers pushes them to search for spiritual healing across the religious market. Since its

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Introduction

Elsewhere Affects and the Politics of Engagement across Religious Life-Worlds

Omar Kasmani, Nasima Selim, Hansjörg Dilger, and Dominik Mattes

furnishes believers with unilateral desires of communing with godly beings. If religious action in life or one's communication with divine realms is to serve mostly an afterlife or to connect to the Else where, it follows that the sense of being political

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Portrait

Talal Asad

Talal Asad, Jonathan Boyarin, Nadia Fadil, Hussein Ali Agrama, Donovan O. Schaefer, and Ananda Abeysekara

've kept my copy of the book from that time). It was attractive to a teenager for its enormous simplicity about language and the world and for its enunciation of a method for sorting out sense from nonsense. But the desire to disassociate myself from the

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Politicizing Elsewhere(s)

Negotiating Representations of Neo-Pentecostal Aesthetic Practice in Berlin

Dominik Mattes

of engaging with the Elsewhere, and the third one revolved around my description of the church's relations to other religious groups and its immediate social surrounding, all three of them could essentially be read as reflecting the church's desire

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An Ethics of Response

Protestant Christians’ Relation with God and Elsewheres

Ingie Hovland

’ ( Engelke 2007 ). I have argued instead that Protestant Christians’ engagement with the transcendent is more accurately described as an unstable composite relation, that is, a relation made up of many moving strands. Christians’ desire for God to be present

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Philippine Prison Marriages

The Politics of Kinship and Women's Composite Agency

Sif Lehman Jensen

women's diverse and persistent courses of actions as they strive to fulfill contradictory desires, which arise from social norms as well as their personal aspirations. Mahmood (2005) allows us to understand how women willingly appropriate domains of

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The Other Secular Modern

An Empirical Critique of Asad

Steve Bruce

Talal Asad explains the marginalization of religion in liberal democracies by invoking the modern state's desire to control. This paper argues that, in the Anglophone world, self-conscious secularism played little or no part in the secularization of public life. The expansion of the secular sphere was primarily an unintended consequence of actions by religious impositionists. Far from leading the promotion of the secular, the state had to be pressed by the demands of religious minorities to reduce the powers of established religion. The state provision of secular social services was usually a reaction to the inability of competing religious organizations to continue their provision. As this review of church–state relations in the UK, USA, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand shows, the reduction in the social power of religion owed more to the failure of Christians to agree than to a deliberately secularizing state.

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“What about Last Time?”

Exploring Potentiality in Danish Young Women’s Violent Conflicts

Ann-Karina Henriksen

The article explores how violence as actuality and potentiality shapes the lives of Danish at-risk girls and young women. The article draws on seven months of ethnographic fieldwork in Copenhagen and includes 25 girls and young women aged 13 to 23 who have all experienced using physical violence. Centering on a single young woman’s narrative, violence is analyzed as a meaningful social practice intimately linked to navigating violent social terrains and managing precarious everyday lives characterized by instability and marginalization. Drawing on the concept of potentiality, it is argued that violent interactions are shaped by both the fear of oncoming danger and the desire for powerful social positions. This perspective opens a micro-longitudinal perspective, which explores situational dynamics of violence through time, hereby contributing to micro-sociological studies of violence.

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Introduction

Dialogues and Trajectories

Simon Coleman and Ramon Sarró

In his luminous reflections on the intellectual trajectory that he has traced so far—beginning with the modern and proceeding through the secular toward the global—José Casanova notes that his evolving interests took him away from anthropology and toward sociology. Yet Casanova’s work has remained influential on, and in conversation with, that of many anthropologists, not least as a result of his desire to transcend a “Western-centric view of history and human development” (this volume) as well as his predictions that Pentecostalism may well become the predominant form of Christianity in the twenty-first century. This second volume of Religion and Society presents Casanova—author of the classic Public Religions in the Modern World (1994)—in dialogue with his own past and shifting present, but also responding to the comments of scholars who are themselves anthropologically informed and yet able to represent perspectives from sociology, theology, and religious studies.