Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 27 items for :

  • "philosophy" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Margaret D. Lecompte

This article describes how different constituencies in a major research university tried to initiate change despite disagreements over common goals, norms and principles. The context was a culture war. The university administration wanted to impose a corporatising and privatising philosophy which it felt was crucial to preserving the university's academic integrity and its financial survival in a time of budgetary crisis. Faculty viewed these actions as serious threats to shared governance, faculty control over the curriculum, instruction and research, academic freedom and the faculty's constitutional rights. These forces played out in the firing and grievance cases of Ward Churchill and Adrienne Anderson, professors whose research and publications angered members of the political and academic establishment and galvanised protests pro and con from the media, conservative politicians and public intellectuals.

Restricted access

Paulina Mihailova

The article investigates how university lecturers taking part in the compulsory teacher training at Stockholm University (SU) conceive of the effects of standardised and formalised training on their teaching. The study explores the emotions and responses evoked among academics when everyone is required to embrace the same pedagogic philosophy of constructive alignment (Biggs 2003), adopt the language of learning outcomes and assign the same standards to diverse academic practices. The article attempts to shed light on different conceptions of the quality of teaching and learning in higher education and the interplay between the lecturers' values of academic freedom, collegiality and disciplinary expertise and the university leadership's values of efficiency, accountability and measurability of performance. The article considers how these conceptions coexist and are negotiated within the university as an organisation.

Restricted access

What History is good for

Service-learning and studying the past

Michael Smith

Many disciplines in the social sciences and humanities can offer profound insights into what it means to be human. History, however, encompasses the totality of human experience: economics, politics, philosophy, art, ethics, sociology, science - all of it becomes part of history eventually. Therefore, the opportunities for incorporating service-learning (carefully integrating community service with academic inquiry and reflecting on insights derived from such integration) into history courses abound. Many historians have taken advantage of this opportunity. Few historians have undertaken a scholarly investigation of the learning taking place in their service-learning courses, however. Indeed, despite the fact that the reflective process so central to service-learning lends itself remarkably well to the scholarship of teaching and learning (it generates very rich data on both the affective and content-based learning students are experiencing), there has been little published SoTL research from any discipline about service-learning. Drawing on qualitative evidence from an honours course comprised of 16 students at a private liberal arts college in the northeastern United States, I argue that not only does service-learning in history lead to more active citizenship, but that it also leads to deeper appreciation of an historical perspective as a key ingredient for being an engaged citizen.

Restricted access

Susan Brin Hyatt

As a political and economic philosophy, neoliberalism has been used to reshape schools and universities, making them far more responsive to the pressures of the market. The principles associated with neoliberalism have also extended to programmes for urban economic development, particularly with respect to the largescale gentrification of neighbourhoods rendering them amenable to investments aimed at creating spaces attractive to white, middle-and-upper class consumers. In this article, I discuss how universities themselves have come to play a significant role as urban developers and investors, promoting commercial retail development and building upscale housing in neighbourhoods adjacent to their campuses. My entry point into this discussion is through describing an ethnographic methods class I taught in 2003, whereby students carried out collaborative research in the African-American neighbourhood surrounding Temple University's main campus in Philadelphia. As a result of their work, we produced a neighbourhood newspaper that sought to disrupt the commonplace assumptions about 'rescuing' the neighbourhood from what was presented as an inexorable spiral of decline; rather, our work showed that actions taken by the university, itself, had helped to produce the very symptoms of decline that the new development project now purported to remedy.

Restricted access

Inside the global teaching machine

MOOCs, academic labour and the future of the university

Michael A. Peters

the centre, whereas cMOOCs tend to be driven by the philosophy underlying social media of many-to-many equalised flat peer structures. My major contention is that MOOCs should be seen within the framework of post-industrial education and cognitive

Free access

Penny Welch and Susan Wright

theory and relations between sovereign nation-states. Moreover, realism is the dominant theoretical perspective and state security the main focus. While accepting that the field of International Relations is built on Western history and philosophy, the

Restricted access

Mike Neary and Joss Winn

curriculum should reflect the nature of co-operative society: critical political economy, the history of the workers’ movement, working class intellectuality and philosophy, gender studies (co-operative women), making links between the natural and the social

Open access

Enacting inclusivity in the preparation of emerging scholars

A response to programme reform in higher education

Saran Stewart, Chayla Haynes, and Kristin Deal

adopting a Freirean (2010) philosophy, which understands education as a locus for social and political change. All courses adhered to inclusive pedagogy, a reflexive and critical educational approach, which helped students experience education as a

Restricted access

Invisible labour

Do we need to reoccupy student engagement policy?

Sarah Hayes

Educational Philosophy and Theory . Singapore : Springer , 1 – 6 . Hayes , S. and Bartholomew , P. ( 2015 ) ‘ Where’s the humanity? Challenging the policy discourse of technology enhanced learning ’, in J. Branch , P. Bartholomew and C

Restricted access

Sintayehu Kassaye Alemu

Africa is not African in its foundation, structures, principles, organisation, philosophy and so on. In addition, African higher education institutions are still suffering from unequal centre–periphery link situations that deny free hand of action in