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What Am I Still Doing Here?

Travel, Travel Writing, and Old Age

Robin Jarvis

their sixties and seventies; some even carry on into their eighties. This phenomenon of the older travel writer has received little or no critical attention (gender, race, sexuality, and nationality have provided important analytical frames, but age is

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Among Cannibals and Headhunters

Jack London in Melanesia

Keith Newlin

’s thinking about race. In Jack London’s Racial Lives , for example, Jeanne Reesman argues that the voyage “occasioned a dramatic change in his racial thinking, as he learned much more about the diverse peoples of the world than his earlier racialist ideas

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An Ordinary Place

Aboriginality and 'Ordinary' Australia in Travel Writing of the 1990s

Robert Clarke

Recent Australian travel narratives are distinguished by the way they represent Indigenous Australian cultures. Moreover, the experience of white Australian culture in recent travel writing by visiting authors like Bill Bryson (In a Sunburned Country/Down Under, 2000), Annie Caulfield (The Winners' Enclosure, 1999), and Mark McCrum (No Worries, 1997) is influenced by the authors' experiences of Aboriginality and Australia's heritage of colonialism and race relations. Following a trend in contemporary travel writing to explore ordinary life, the works of Bryson, Caulfield and McCrum seek 'ordinary Australia' and discover, through encounters with Aboriginality, a place and culture far removed from either the stereotypes of tourist brochures, or the quirky characters that inhabit the soap operas and films that have advertised Australia to the rest of the world.

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Meals in Foreign Parts

Food in Writing by Nineteenth-Century British Travellers to the Balkans

Ludmilla Kostova

The interest in the narrative and ideological parameters of travel writing,1 which has been an important feature of the Western European and North American academic contexts over the last fifteen years or so, is undoubtedly a reflection of the unique position of the genre as an area thematising and problematising cultural difference and otherness and as a meeting point of varying discourses of gender, race/ethnicity, class, power, domination and counter-domination. Travel narratives have played a key role in current theoretical debates in postcolonial studies, feminism, cultural studies and comparative literature. To my mind, a considerable number of the critical texts that they have engendered in those fields, appear to privilege a particular analytical strategy focusing on the interpretation of what Laura E. Ciolkowski has termed ‘gender-coded visual power’ (1998: 343). This power operates through the travelling subject’s gaze, which is intent upon the construction of the relatively stationary object(s) of his/her observation. By persistently privileging the analysis of the gaze critics have tended to ignore and even erase other aspects of the complex processes of mediation and negotiation in which travellers and ‘travellees’ are involved.

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Nick Pearce, Robert Burroughs, Liza Oliver, Susan Parman, Ulrich Ufer, Peter D. Finlay, and Rohrbough

David Blamey (ed.), Here, There, Elsewhere: Dialogues on Location and Mobility. 272 pp. London: Open Editions, 2002. ISBN 0-949-00413-8, £14.99 a22.50 (paper). Review by Nick Pearce

Roger Casement (Séamus Ó Siocháin and Michael O’Sulllivan, eds), The Eyes of Another Race – Roger Casement’s Congo Report and 1903 Diary. ix and 350 pp. Dublin: University College Dublin Press, 2003. ISBN: 1-900621-98-3, £39.95 (hardback) ISBN 1-900621-99-1 £18.95 (paper). Review by Robert Burroughs

Brian Dolan, Exploring European Frontiers: British Tavellers in the Age of Enlightenment. ix + 232 pp. Houndsmills: Palgrave Macmillan Press, 2000. ISBN 0-333-78987-3, £80.00 (hardback). Review by Liza Oliver

Rod Edmond and Vanessa Smith (eds), Islands in History and Representation. xiii and 234 pp. London: Routledge, 2003. ISBN 0-415-28666-2, £60.00 (hardback). Review by Susan Parman

Ina-Maria Greverus, Anthropologisch Reisen. 395 pp. Hamburg: Lit Verlag, 2002. ISBN: 3-8258-5720-4, a12.90. Review by Ulrich Ufer

Glenn Hooper, The Tourist’s Gaze: Travellers to Ireland, 1800–2000. xxxii + 268 pp. Cork: Cork University Press, 2001. ISBN 1-85918-277-1, £45.09/a57.25 (hardback), ISBN 1-85918-323-9, £18.07/a22.95 (paperback). Review by Peter D. Finlay

Michael E. Zega and John E. Gruber, Travel by Train: The American Railroad Poster, 1870–1950. xi + 140 pp. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002, ISBN: 0-253-34153-3, £43.00 (hardback). Review by Malcolm Rohrbough

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Eyewitness Accounts during the Putumayo Rubber Boom

Manuel Antonio Mesones Muro—the Madman of the Marañon River, Cárlos Oyague y Calderón—the State Engineer, and Roger Casement—Not of the Real World Humanitarian

Rupert J. M. Medd and Hélène Guyot

Between 1870 and 1915 Peru experienced a rubber-boom, extending into the Putumayo River region in 1893. This huge region of Amazonian forests was controlled by the Peruvian Amazon Company (P. A. Co.). Although Peruvian, they had British company directors and a British-Barbadian workforce. Their methods of extraction generated unimaginable degrees of human and ecological violence. Roger Casement, a British diplomat, was sent on a harrowing mission to investigate these allegations made by travelers. His Amazon Journal takes precedence; however, Peruvians also responded to the situation, reporting to the Geographical Society of Lima. Included are two forgotten yet influential Peruvian explorers: the geographer Manuel Antonio Mesones Muro and the engineer Cárlos Oyague y Calderón. By highlighting some of the early debates that circulated between Europe and Latin America on the natural resources and people of the Amazon forests, the focus is to draw out textual examples of perceptions on race, environment, and early consumer responsibility. Supported by coloniality/modernity theories, it also asks whether this form of travel writing was functioning as a resistance literature to imperialism for the time. Thus, this study investigates alternative readings that might also inform twenty-first-century scholars and activists as they articulate environmentalist and even social and ecological positions.

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“Space without People”

Austro-German Filmmaker, Bestselling Author, and Journalist Colin Ross Discovers Australia

Siegfried Mattl

Australians in the book are highly ambivalent. Surprisingly, Ross rejects any notion of a singular native “race” and refers instead to the cultural and linguistic diversity of Australian indigenous peoples. Writing on indigenous personalities he met on his

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Landscapes and Races in Early Twentieth-Century Peru

The Travels of José Uriel García and Aurelio Miró Quesada Sosa

Rupert J. M. Medd

relations of power … existed and acted simultaneously … in a single and whole structure of power” (2008: 221). This foresight permitted him to develop theories that colonialism incorporated the control of economy, authority, race, subjectivity, and

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Amy Cox Hall, Sergio González Varela, Jessica S.R. Robinson, Peter Weisensel, and David Wills

, interpretation, and development of different body skills. One wonders if it is the same to be an American, African, or an Asian capoeira pilgrim, or whether nationality or race plays a role or not as a ballroom dance practitioner. These and other similar

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“Many and Dreadful Disasters”

Mediterranean Travel, Plague, and Quarantine in the Late Eighteenth Century

Kathryn Walchester

the human race. And we should not imagine, either, that the danger of great epidemics is past; modern science and medical organization have certainly mitigated theireffects in recent years, but the battle still continues. ( Swinson 1965: 9 ) Human