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Laura T. Di Summa-Knoop

and now” but that may not be appropriate or plausible in the future. What appears as an obstacle to naturalist analysis is instead a strength for criticism, for criticism does benefit from a history of interpretations, from their mutability, and from

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Philip Cowan

] 1997: 1–2)—I believe this is the fundamental strength of Wyler’s work, and what makes him a great director. The process that the actors and director go through, in terms of interpreting a script, would involve understanding and developing the

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The Cine-Fist

Eisenstein’s Attractions, Mirror Neurons, and Contemporary Action Cinema

Maria Belodubrovskaya

. Think of the “teeth-to-the-wire” example from Eisenstein’s The Wise Man . From the actor’s perspective, his act is an exertion of effort, strength, and balance. From the clown character’s perspective, this is a gag. Still, the audience has a response

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Andreas Baranowski and Heiko Hecht

( Konkle and Oliva 2011 ). This also extends to social situations and character traits; for instance, low camera angles produce images of strength and high camera angle images of weakness ( Baranowski and Hecht 2017a ; Sevenants and d’Ydewalle 2006 ). With

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Mario Slugan

Bazin holds that precisely this type of identity obtains between photographs and their objects. This means that Morgan’s dismissal of index theory as a description of Bazin’s commitment is unwarranted. In fact, index theory’s particular strength is the

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Brendan Rooney, Hanna Kubicka, Carl Plantinga, James Kendrick, and Johannes Riis

the “creation of lore” (127). Esch’s argument is intriguing and may capture parts of the Hollywood machinery such as the Academy Awards shows and their ritualistic design. Arguably, his account would gain strength from a case study of drama programs

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David Bordwell

Understanding how spectators interact with films requires some theory of filmic representation. This article reviews three such theories. The first, a communication model, assumes that an artwork constitutes or contains a message passed from a sender to a receiver. The second, a signification model, assumes that the film operates within a system of codes and that the perceiver applies codes to signs in the text in order to arrive at meanings. This conception of film as signification may be found in both classic structuralist and post-structuralist accounts. The third, an empirical-experiential model, assumes that an artwork is designed to create an experience for the spectator. This article argues that the cognitive approach to film studies is founded on the third model of representation. The article also traces the strengths and limits of cognitive film theory and its theory of representation.

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Brian Bergen-Aurand

This issue acknowledges the work of Rosalie Fish (Cowlitz), Jordan Marie Daniels (Lakota), and the many others who refuse to ignore the situation that has allowed thousands of Indigenous women and girls to be murdered or go missing across North America without the full intervention of law enforcement and other local authorities. As Rosalie Fish said in an interview regarding her activism on missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG),

"I felt a little heavy at first just wearing the paint. And I think that was . . . like my ancestors letting me know . . . you need to take this seriously: “What you’re doing, you need to do well.” And I think that’s why I felt really heavy when I first put on my paint and when I tried to run with my paint at first. . . . I would say my personal strength comes from my grandmas, my mom, my great grandma, and I really hope that’s true, that I made them proud." (Inland Northwest Native News interview)

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Digitizing the Western Gaze

The End FGM Guardian Global Media Campaign

Jessica Cammaert

-motion scene of girls’ crying from within the room where they were cut, Sembène does not rely on images or audio of pain to communicate his point. Emotion is clear, but not terror, as he relies more on the strength of his female heroine, Collé (Fatoumata

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Editorial

Screening Vulnerability

Brian Bergen-Aurand

rather than capability or ability—with their links to energy, strength, power, and vitality—began to hold a more central place in my research and critical thought. I began rethinking what bodies do and what they do to us when we experience them