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Kate Atkinson's Family Romance

Missing Mothers and Hidden Histories in Behind the Scenes at the Museum

Sinead McDermott

From her first novel, Behind the Scenes At the Museum, to her most recent, Case Histories, Kate Atkinson's fiction can be described as attempting to rewrite and revision the family. All of her novels present us with families that have been altered or reshaped in some way, usually because of the loss of a mother or a child. Her narratives are driven by the need to account for these losses: to discover the fate of the missing family members, and in the process to uncover often unpleasant family secrets. In Atkinson's fictions, the family is revealed as a disturbing place, the site of violence, resentments and jealousies as much as love and affection. At the same time, the continued return to family plots in her novels suggests that the family, regardless of its flaws, is not an institution that either she or her protagonists can easily leave behind. Atkinson's first novel, Behind the Scenes At The Museum, like her later fiction, is both an attempt to critique and debunk received notions of family, and an exploration of familial loss and longing.

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Kate Cairns

motherhood .” International Journal of Children's Rights 16 ( 2008 ): 177 – 194 . 10.1163/157181808X301773 Cairns , Kate . 2018a . “ Beyond magic carrots: Garden pedagogies and the rhetoric of effects .” Harvard Educational Review 88 ( 4 ): 516

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‘Master, Slave and Merciless Struggle’

Sin and Lovelessness in Sartre's Saint Genet

Kate Kirkpatrick

: Pantheon, 1984). 2 See Kate Kirkpatrick, ‘Sartre: An Augustinian Atheist’‚ Sartre Studies International 21, no. 1 (2015): 1–20; Kate Kirkpatrick, Sartre on Sin: Between Being and Nothingness (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017). 3 Iris Murdoch

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With an Open Mind and Open Heart

Collections Care at the Laboratory of Archaeology

Kate Roth

Views into Museum Procedures: Hope and Practice at the National Museum of the American Indian .” Pp. 72 – 80 in Peers and Brown 2003a . Roth , Kate . 2015 . “ Practices of Collaboration: Exploring Institutional Culture at the Laboratory of

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Mohamed Assaf and Kate Clanchy

ABSTRACT

Five poems written by Mohamed Assaf (a young Syrian boy who currently lives in Oxford with his family and studies at Oxford Spires Academy) under the mentorship of the poet Kate Clanchy. The introduction and poems themselves offer a reflection on Mohamed’s old and new place(s) in the world, and the signifi cance of writing as a way of responding to, and resisting, “refugeedom.”

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Kate Pride Brown

Together ”. Journal of Hydrology 519 : 2632 – 2641 . 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2014.05.047 Brighenti , Andrea . 2007 . “ Visibility: A Category for the Social Sciences ”. Current Sociology 55 ( 3 ): 323 – 342 . 10.1177/0011392107076079 Brown , Kate Pride

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Edited by Ârash Aminian Tabrizi, Kate Kirkpatrick, and Marieke Mueller

possibilities for thinking with Sartre – today. Ârash Aminian Tabrizi Kate Kirkpatrick Marieke Mueller

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Kate Kirkpatrick

This article attempts to redress the neglect of Sartre's relationship to Augustine, putting forward a reading of the early Sartre as an atheist who appropriated concepts from Augustinian theology. In particular, it is argued, Sartre owes a debt to the Augustinian doctrine of original sin. Sartre's portrait of human reality in Being and Nothingness is bleak: consciousness is lack; self-knowledge is impossible; and to turn to the human other is to face the imprisonment of an objectifying gaze. But this has recognizable antecedents in Augustine's account of the condition of human fallenness. The article, therefore, (a) demonstrates the significant similarities between Sartre's ontology of human freedom and Augustine's ontology of human sin; and (b) asks whether Sartre's project – as defined in Existentialism Is a Humanism – 'to draw the full conclusions from a consistently atheistic position' – results in a vision of the world without God, but not without sin. It is proposed that this opens the possibility for a previously unexplored theological reading of Sartre's early work.

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“A Pretty Girl of Sixteen“

Capturing the Contradictions of Female Adolescence in the Nancy Drew Series

Kate Harper

This article explores the construction of female adolescence in the first three texts of the Nancy Drew Mystery series: The Secret of the Old Clock (1930), The Hidden Staircase (1930), and The Bungalow Mystery (1930). It reviews, briefly, the development of the concept of adolescence and its gendered implications, particularly the association of female adolescent sexuality with delinquency. I argue that the Nancy Drew series rejects the construction of adolescence as a period of turmoil and emotional instability, as well as the prescription of constant adult supervision. The character of Nancy Drew also captures the contradictory messages of female adolescence in the 1930s when girls were represented as sexually attractive and aggressive but were denied sexual desire.

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Imperial Mobility

Circulation as History in East Asia under Empire

Kate McDonald

Histories of modern mobility often assume that modern forms of movement arrived in East Asia as part of a universal process of historical development. This article shows that the valorization of modern mobility in East Asia emerged out of the specific context of Euro-American imperial encroachment and Japanese imperial expansion. Through an examination of the tropes of opening and connecting, the article argues that the mobility of the modern can be understood as an “imperial” mobility in two senses: one, as a key component in European, American, and Japanese arguments for the legitimacy of empire; and two, as a global theory of history that constituted circulation as a measure of historical difference.