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Adopting a Resistance Lens

An Exploration of Power and Legitimacy in Transitional Justice

Julie Bernath and Sandra Rubli

; Sriram 2012 ). However, while power and legitimacy have gained significant attention, the concept of “resistance” has not been comprehensively addressed. For transitional justice scholars, resistance is often simply associated with actors who show a lack

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Analyzing Resistance to Transitional Justice

What Can We Learn from Hybridity?

Briony Jones

convincingly argued elsewhere (see, e.g., McEvoy and McGregor 2008 ), and the purpose of this article is not to rehearse such arguments but instead to take them as entry points into an underexplored aspect of these tensions: resistance. While much of the

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Lia Friesem

references that are currently being produced on Twitter amount to an act of resistance by Israeli users who oppose the ‘Holocaustization’ ( Zandberg 2006 ) of Israeli life by the state and its agents. First, users reject the hegemonic narratives and rhetoric

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Fighting Fire with Fire

Resistance to Transitional Justice in Bahrain

Ciara O’Loughlin

The purpose of this article is to explore the nature of resistance to transitional justice in Bahrain. To date, much academic attention has been directed toward measuring the effects of transitional justice mechanisms on dependent variables such as

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Using International Criminal Law to Resist Transitional Justice

Legal Rupture in the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia

Mikael Baaz and Mona Lilja

] global liberal governance” ( Pugh 2004: 41 ). This, in turn, may lead to dissatisfaction, alienation, and “resistance” against the approach as such ( Jones, Bernath, and Rubli 2013: 9 ). Following such criticism there is currently increasing interest in

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Democratization of Perpetration

Human Rights, Transitional Justice, and Memories of Resistance in Post-Conflict Timor-Leste

Amy Rothschild

This article examines the effects of human rights and transitional justice on memories of Timor-Leste’s resistance to the Indonesian occupation, which lasted from 1975 to 1999. Data comes from ethnographic fieldwork in Timor, centered around remembrance of two major acts of resistance: an armed uprising in 1983 and a peaceful demonstration in 1991. The article argues that in Timor, an “apolitical” human rights has caused a post-conflict “democratization of perpetration”, in that similar culpability is assigned to all those who caused suffering in the conflict with Indonesia through physical violence, irrespective of context. Transitional justice has thus expanded the category of perpetrator in Timor, to include some who legally used armed resistance against Indonesian rule. Studies of violence have belatedly turned toward examining perpetrators of state terror; this article examines how discourses of human rights and transitional justice shape perceptions of those who resist state terror with violence.

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Corinna Mullin and Ian Patel

which a globally sponsored domestic institutional process unfolds; and the societal level, where various struggles and diffuse instances of power and resistance are often located. This article is mindful of debates around agency and resistance in

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Gigi Moti

to express resistance to those values. As a result, we have the creation of particularistic identities—Ashkenazim and Mizrahim, and kibbutz and Sderot identities. notes 1 For an analysis of the 60-year period, see Gigi (2016). 2 According to the 1972

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Staying and Critiquing

Israeli Orthodox Women Filmmakers

Valeria Seigelsheifer and Tova Hartman

Over the past two decades, Israeli Orthodox Jewish women filmmakers have used film to speak in a public voice about various subjects that were previously taboo. Although there are aspects of Orthodoxy to which these filmmakers object, they do so as ‘devoted resisters’. Rather than expressing heretical opposition, the women stay committed to Orthodoxy precisely because they are able to use filmmaking to resist. In their negotiations of voice used to ‘justify’ their decision to become filmmakers, the women position themselves as ‘accidental’ filmmakers, thereby remaining within Orthodoxy while critiquing it through their films. Cultural resistance in this case is not carried out as defiance to Orthodox Judaism but rather out of a relationship with it, featuring a form of resistance that insists upon devotion to multiple commitments.

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The Women of the Wall

A Metaphor for National and Religious Identity

Pnina Lahav

The Women of the Wall wish to participate in communal prayer in the women's section of the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Their practice is to pray as a group, wrap themselves in a tallit, and read from the Torah scroll. They represent Jewish pluralism in that their group includes Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and secular women. They represent openness to change in that they base their claims on Halakhic interpretation, thereby embracing the capacity of Jewish law to evolve. This article reviews the resistance of the religious and political establishment in Israel to their claim and their struggle, unsuccessful so far, to get recognition.