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Paula Kabalo

socially disempowered groups in the 1950s and 1960s: the Arab citizenry and inhabitants of the peripheral neighborhoods of Tel Aviv–Jaffa. Underlying the study is the view of ‘particularistic’ associations as instruments for the shaping of democratic norms

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Nicholas Hewitt

It is no exaggeration to state that before the Revolution of 1958–1959 Cuba barely impinged on the French national consciousness, with the exception of the occasional role of Paris as host for international conferences on the island’s future. The island’s French colony was never large: indeed, the mausoleum in the Necropólis Cristóbal Cólon in Havana is a touching reminder of a small group, numbering no more than sixty, who, between the 1930s and the early 1960s, maintained a fragile French commercial presence.

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Marcus Otto

This article analyzes how the fundamental challenge of decolonization has resonated in history textbooks published in France since the 1960s. It therefore contextualizes textbook knowledge within different areas of society and focuses on predominant discourses that influenced history textbooks' (post)colonial representations in the period examined. These discourses encompass the crisis of Western civilization, modernization, republican integration, and the postcolonial politics of memory. The author argues that history textbooks have thus become media, as well as objects of an emerging postcolonial politics of memory that involves intense conflicts over immigration and national identity and challenges France's (post)colonial legacy in general.

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Walter K. Goldsmith, S. Charles Lewson, Ronald Jacobs, Harold Vallins, Lionel Blue, Jonathan Magonet, Awraham Soetendorp, Jill Suss, M.R. Heilbron and Dow Marmur

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Introduction

Gabriel

George Craig

In this brief introduction to the Symposium to celebrate the 75th birthday of Gabriel Josipovici, held at the University of Sussex on 10 September 2016, the author recalls his first meeting with Gabriel during the 1960s, when literary criticism was dominated by a particular English perspective. As a cultural outsider, Gabriel introduced new approaches, particularly from France, that became part of transformative changes to the discipline as taught at the university.

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Natalia Starostina

In the aftermath of the Russian Revolution of 1917, many Russian writers including Ivan Bunin (1870–1953) and Nadezhda Teffi (1872–1952) immigrated to France. Their works were imbued with longing for the bygone epoch and for their lost motherland. In Russian émigré literature, this nostalgic outlook produced the mythology of the Belle Époque as the period of prosperity and social harmony. This romanticized view of the past became integrated in the political and intellectual discourses of two influential French writers, Romain Gary (1914–1980) and Elsa Triolet (1896–1970). The article addresses how Russian nostalgia for a pre-1917 period paved the way for the rise of the myth of the Belle Époque, a myth that became increasingly influential in twentieth-century French history.

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Whitney Walton

This essay examines representations of Jacqueline Kennedy's French connections in American and French popular media and in accounts of the Kennedy presidency to assert her significance in French-American relations and in United States foreign relations broadly construed to include, in Kristin Hoganson's words, “imaginative engagement with peoples“ of other nations and cultures. While biographers routinely acknowledge French influences in Mrs. Kennedy's life and in her practices as first lady, this study focuses on them in depth, notably the undergraduate junior year she spent studying in France in 1949-50 that consolidated her knowledge and appreciation of all things French, and cultivated her interest in other cultures generally. As first lady, she was uniquely positioned to perform these qualities on an international stage. This deployment of Frenchness enhanced her own and JFK's popularity at home and abroad, and suggested a more cosmopolitan way of being American at the height of the Cold War.

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Pogo, Pop and Politics

Robert Benayoun on Comics and Roy Lichtenstein

Gavin Parkinson

’Écart absolu , Paris, December 1965. Unknown photographer. was one of France’s foremost experts by the 1960s. 3 Sometimes the two overlapped, as in his contribution to the number of La Méthode devoted to ‘Les Comics’ in February 1963, where Benayoun gave

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Delinquents, Savages, and Lovers

An Introduction to the Cinema of Boyhood

Jeffery P. Dennis

Introduces this special issue’s theme of “Boys and Cinema,” discussing the emergence of a specific, international cinema of boyhood in the early 1960s, and five main themes established within it by the late 1960s.

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Heroes of Our Time

The Historical-Political Context of Devorah Omer’s Novels

Rima Shikhmanter

suggestion of Uriel Ofek, a prominent editor and translator of children’s literature who, in the 1960s, began to explore the possibility of publishing a new series of books on leading Zionist figures. This series, which had yet to gain traction, was to be