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John H. Gillespie

This two-part article examines whether Sartre's final interviews, recorded in L'Espoir maintenant [Hope Now], indicate a final turn to belief through an overview of his engagement with the idea of God throughout his career. In Part 1 we examine Sartre's early atheism, but note the pervasive nature of secularised Christian metaphors and concepts in his religion of letters and the centrality of man's desire to be God in Being and Nothingness. His theoretical writings seek to refute the idea of God, but in doing so God is paradoxically both absent and present. In Part 2 we assess his anti-theism and consider his final encounter with theism in L'Espoir maintenant, arguing that it is part of Sartre's long-term engagement with the idea of God.

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John H. Gillespie

These two articles examine whether Sartre's final interviews, recorded in L'Espoir maintenant (Hope Now) indicate a final turn to God and religious belief through an overview of his engagement with the idea of God throughout his career. Part 1, published in Sartre Studies International 19, no. 1, examined Sartre's early atheism, but noted the pervasive nature of secularised Christian metaphors and concepts in his religion of letters and also the centrality of mankind's desire to be God in L'Etre et le néant (Being and Nothingness). Sartre's theoretical writings sought to refute the idea of God, but in doing so, made God paradoxically both absent and present. Part 2 considers Sartre's anti-theism and its implications for his involvement with the idea of God before examining in detail his final encounter with theism as outlined in L'Espoir maintenant, arguing that it is part of Sartre's long-term engagement with the divine, but refuting the idea that he became a theist at the end of his life.

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Daniel O'Shiel

Nature, God as radical Otherness, and God as absolute Value—all of which have not been fully recognised until now. On the back of this I will show, thirdly, that because God in a more theoretical—which is to say philosophical, theological or otherwise

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Toward a Naturalized Aesthetics of Film Music

An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Intramusical and Extramusical Meaning

Timothy Justus

classic work Emotion and Meaning in Music (1956), is that between what he termed “absolute meaning” and “referential meaning.” Following more recent terminology in the psychology of music (e.g., Koelsch 2012 ), I will use the related phrases

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‘Which is the merchant here, and which the Jew?’

Alterity, Sameness and Irony in Venice

Anna Carleton Forrester

uncontainable. I shall argue that Antonio’s sadness manifests as a malady born out of recognizing spiritual, physical and intellectual similitude with Shylock, the Jewish usurer of Venice, despite Antonio’s active insistence upon their absolute difference. This

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Wal-Mart Goes To Germany

Culture, Institutions, and the Limits of Globalization

Matthias Kaelberer

surprising outcome, I argue that efficiency is not absolute, but rather context-specific and socially constructed. What appeared from the American business perspective as a rather inefficient German retail market was in fact quite efficient from the viewpoint

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Common Democracy

Political Representation beyond Representative Democracy

Alexandros Kioupkiolis

. Absolute Democracy beyond Representation? On the other side of the debate, Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri (2004: 240–241, 247, 255) uncover a certain promise of absolute democracy that is embedded from the outset in modern democracy—the “rule of everyone

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Nonrecording the “European refugee crisis” in Greece

Navigating through irregular bureaucracy

Katerina Rozakou

coconstitutive character. Drawing upon border procedures, I claim that “the magic of the state” ( Das 2004 ) is totally compatible with the ambiguity and even irregularity of state bureaucratic modalities. At the same time, absolute control through a rational

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Matthew C. Eshleman

This essay argues that an adequate account of bad faith cannot be given without taking the second half of Being and Nothingness into consideration. There are two separate but related reasons for this. First, the objectifying gaze of Others provides a necessary condition for the possibility of bad faith. Sartre, however, does not formally introduce analysis of Others until Parts III and IV. Second, upon the introduction of Others, Sartre revises his view of absolute freedom. Sartre's considered view of freedom helps to make sense out of bad faith in a way that does not seem possible were freedom absolute.

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Andrea Zielinski

The word 'identity' actually means 'absolute sameness'. Here, one speaks of 'self identity' or 'social identity'. Sharon Macdonald describes social identity as 'allegiance to people, group and often, place and past'. With regard to this topic we would rather say that identity is the process of assimilating to a norm regarded as given and static.