Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,612 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

David Art

integration possible. Time will tell if 2017 was the year that this formula was abandoned. Notes 1 See David Art, “The Containment of the Radical Right in Europe,” Ethnic and Racial Studies 38, no. 8 (2015): 1347–1354. 2 John Lewis Gaddis

Restricted access

Anthropology, Art, and Folklore

Competing Visions of Museum Collecting in Early Twentieth-Century America

Ira Jacknis

At the turn of the last century, it was not at all a settled question as to what kinds of objects museums should collect. The boundaries between art and anthropology and between art and craft were fluid and contested. In the great age of museum

Restricted access

The Musée du Quai Branly

Art? Artifact? Spectacle!

Herman Lebovics

Designed by Jean Nouvel, the Musée du Quai Branly, the just-opened museum of African, Amerindian, Pacific, and Asian cultures, covers a city block on the Left Bank of Paris's museum row. Both in landscaping and internal layout, Nouvel wished to frame the building within his understanding of the cultures on display inside, but also within its setting in the metropolitan capital. Objects collected in the imperial age now are displayed in what French officials see as the postcolonial era. But how were the pieces on display to be shown: as works of art or well-made cultural artifacts? Nouvel took the lead in evoking a vision of the cultures on display that is closer to Joseph Conrad's dark tales than to enlightened contemporary scholarship and museology on these societies. Neither an art nor an ethnography museum, the Musée du Quai Branly is a spectacle about the societies of the global South.

Restricted access

The Art of Doubting

A Christian Perspective

Daniela Koeppler

sensual perception. Before I continue, I may perhaps say a few things about myself: I was born in Northern Germany, baptised in the Protestant Church, and my perspective on the ‘Art of Doubting’ will be a Christian-Protestant and a German-European one. I

Restricted access

Cheryl Finley

This article examines the impact of art, performance, and technology on the global transformation of heritage tourism in recent years. Thanks to a series of case studies focusing on sites of memory deemed important to diasporic Africans, this article shows how art, performance, and technology are central to identity formation through an examination of mnemonic aesthetics and practices. Recent changes in heritage tourism have given rise to the establishment of categories such as “tangible“ and “intangible“ heritage as well as the construction of museums, the implementation of walking tours or the promotion of reenactments and ritual performances alongside environmental, volunteer, and virtual tourism. But how do tourists' interpretations of historic sites of memory change when various economic, political, social, and cultural factors converge globally? People seek experiences and outlets that could enable them to cling to those things that are familiar to them, while enabling them to identify with like communities in the midst of ground-shaking social, technological, economic, and political changes. Heritage tourism is one of those social practices that produces a sense of centeredness through a complex negotiation and presentation of memory, art, and performance.

Restricted access

“[W]hat Beauty in Oriental Art Means”

Asian Arts, Soft Diplomacy, and New Zealand Cultural Nationalism—The Loan Exhibition of Oriental Art, Christchurch, 1935

James Beattie and Louise Stevenson

Depression-era Aotearoa New Zealand, and considering the place of Chinese art in the developing cultural nationalism of New Zealand in this period. The detailed case study of this article also responds to a recent plea by Conal McCarthy for studies in New

Restricted access

Mor Cohen

In 1992, Sarah Breitberg-Semel spoke of the inability of a political avantgarde to take root in Israel: “The political avant-garde [art] in the country has never been able to gain traction. Its principles, its political background, were not clear to

Restricted access

Murray Smith

speakers and audience members on all of these occasions, as I did from the symposium “Is Psychology Relevant to Aesthetics?” devoted jointly to Film, Art, and the Third Culture (hereafter, FACT) 1 and Bence Nanay’s Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception

Restricted access

Using Art to Resist Epistemic Injustice

The Aesthetics of the Oppressed and Democratic Freedom

Gustavo H. Dalaqua

differently, engage each other directly” ( Pratt and Johnston 2007: 107 ). 14 By giving vent to the many conflicts that permeate social life, the Nuclei, just like the aesthetics of the oppressed in general, use art in order to promote an agonistic

Restricted access

Angela Curran

Book Review of Berys Gaut, A Philosophy of Cinematic Art