Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "African ethics" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

The Common Good and a Teleological Conception of Rights

An Article on the African Philosophy of Rights

Sabelo Ndwandwe

A common communitarian criticism of rights discourse picks at the individualistic picture of rights which is said to presuppose a society where persons are conscious of their separateness. In contrast, an African communitarian society is said to put less emphasis on individual interests; it encourages harmony, not divergence of interests, competition, and conflict. Thus, preoccupation with rights would be incompatible with and even hostile to the possibility of community. This article argues the opposite; it submits that rights and community are mutually constitutive. To this end, I explore T. H. Green’s social recognition thesis which reconceptualises rights and obligations in a teleological framework. When conceived in this fashion, rights transcend antithetical relations between individuals and society as typified by classical natural rights thinkers. I argue that, considering a normative significance of the common good, a compelling account of rights in African philosophy is better conceived in a teleological framework.

Restricted access

Olusegun Steven Samuel and Ademola Kazeem Fayemi

serious implications for biodiversity conservation efforts in Africa and beyond. In defending the above claims, the first section discusses Metz's theory of MR in African ethics. The second assesses Metz's defence of MR. We conclude the article with some

Restricted access

Motsamai Molefe

In this article, I motivate for the view that the best account of the foundations of morality in the African tradition should be grounded on some relevant spiritual property – a view that I call 'ethical supernaturalism'. In contrast to this position, the literature has been dominated by humanism as the best interpretation of African ethics, which typically is accompanied by a direct rejection of 'ethical supernaturalism' and a veiled rejection of non-naturalism (Gyekye 1995: 129–43; Metz 2007: 328; Wiredu 1992: 194–6). Here primarily, by appeal to methods of analytic philosophy, which privileges analysis and (moral) argumentation, I set out to challenge and repudiate humanism as the best interpretation of African ethics; I leave it for a future project to develop a fully fledged African spiritual meta-ethical theory.

Restricted access

Relational Ethics and Partiality

A Critique of Thad Metz’s ‘Towards an African Moral Theory’

Motsamai Molefe

his moral theory renders it relevantly African. And, when it is compared to extant (individualistic) attempts to capture African ethics, Metz considers his account to be (more) plausible insofar as it best captures moral intuitions prevalent below the

Restricted access

Revisiting the Menkiti-Gyekye Debate

Who Is a Radical Communitarian?

Motsamai Molefe

in one’s deportment and conduct (Behrens 2013) . In fact, Gyekye, in an encyclopaedic article wherein he discusses African ethics, observes that ‘Good character is the essence of the African moral system, the linchpin of the moral wheel’ (Gyekye

Full access

Meghan Bellerose, Maryama Diaw, Jessie Pinchoff, Beth Kangwana, and Karen Austrian

approved by the Population Council IRB 1 and Amref Health Africa Ethics and Scientific Review Committee. 2 Participants 18 years and over provided verbal informed consent, and those under 18 provided verbal assent and had a parent or guardian provide

Free access

Technologies of Nonviolence

Ethical Participatory Visual Research with Girls

Astrid Treffry-Goatley, Lisa Wiebesiek, Naydene de Lange, and Relebohile Moletsane

, Munyaradzi . 2009 . African Ethics: An Anthology of Comparative and Applies Ethics . Scottsville, South Africa : University of KwaZulu-Natal Press . Okhahlamba Local Municipality . 2015 . Okhahlamba Local Municipality Language Policy . Pietermaritzburg