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Enis Sulstarova

redefinition of the notions of self and other in the national discourse. An additional transformation in Albanian postcommunist history textbooks has to do with religion. During communism, Albania was officially an atheistic country. Beginning in 1967, all

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Denis Vuka

During the socialist period in Albania, a schema of national history was established that was divided into several major thematic blocks including Ancient Illyria, the Middle Ages (with emphasis on the resistance to the Ottoman Empire), Ottoman rule

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Esilda Luku

Few studies exist concerning the portrayal of the Holocaust in Albanian history textbooks. Recent studies of Albanian textbooks tend to ignore the topic. For example, the book Myth and Mythical Spaces: Conditions and Challenges for History

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Pelasgic Encounters in the Greek-Albanian Borderland

Border Dynamics and Reversion to Ancient Past in Southern Albania

Gilles de Rapper

In the last ten years, many books and articles dedicated to Pelasgians have been published in Albania, mostly by amateur historians and linguists. These works question the official discourse on the Illyrian origin of Albanians inherited from the socialist era. They also question the relationship of Albanians with Greeks, both in ancient times and in the present. Considering the fact that a significant number of those authors originate from southern Albania and that their books are widely read and appreciated in this Albanian borderland, this article argues that the recent success of Pelasgic theories can be partially explained by the new uses of the border in the post-1991 context and by the state of relations between Albanians and Greeks as experienced at the local level. Imagining the Pelasgians as prestigious ancestors appears as an answer to feelings of inequality and marginality related to new practices of the border.

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Denis Vuka

This article explores history teaching in Albania, with particular emphasis on educational and methodological aspects of new history textbooks published after the liberalization of the school textbook market in 2008. National history textbooks serve as a basis for the assessment of changing educational principles and methodologies in history teaching in terms of five qualitative factors: educational aims, teaching techniques and methodologies, historical narratives, visual materials, and sources. The article thus assesses the degree to which textbooks fulfill their educational function and help to put learning theories into practice. The author also places the revision and reevaluation of national history textbooks in Albania in context by comparing them to the progress of Kosovo's recently established educational system.

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“They don’t even know how to copy”

The discourse on originality in Albania’s art world

Sofia Kalo

Albanian-born artists alongside that of well-known Western ones. The images, which were positioned parallel to each other in order to make the supposed similarities between the works more salient, were headed by the word “COPY” in capital red letters. The

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Migration, residential investment, and the experience of “transition”

Tracing transnational practices of Albanian migrants in Athens

Gerda Dalipaj

This article discusses the transnational residential practices of Albanian internal and international migrant families. The targeted migrants have property rights and social and emotional attachments to old and new houses/apartments in Albania and

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Between Conflicting Systems

An Ordinary Tragedy in Now-Capitalist Albania

Matthew Rosen

of Tirana, the Albanian capital. Over the next five years, the booksellers brought the store out of bankruptcy and transformed it into a vibrant cultural institution. Seeing the popularity of the business expand, the property owner asked for a large

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Interreligious Cultural Practice as Lived Reality

The Case of Muslim and Orthodox Shepherds in Middle Albania

Eckehard Pistrick

This essay provides grass-roots insights into interreligiosity in Middle Albania. I focus on two individuals, Muslim Arif and Orthodox Anastas, to show how notions of cultural intimacy prevail over hegemonic discourses on religious identity that have re-emerged in postsocialist and 'post-atheist' Albania. The process of religious revitalisation took place simultaneously with a pervasive reshaping of local cultural identity. These discourses give simultaneously an opportunity for religious differentiation and symbolic contestations, as well as for diverse collaborations on a social, cultural and economic level. I illustrate how cultural intimacy is performed and cultivated as a shared practice of multipart singing, and understood by the local shepherds not as a marker of difference but as common ground for mutual dialogue. By sharing the social activity of singing the shepherds do not only form a 'sonic community' but also celebrate an interreligious 'community of friends'.

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(Re)sounding Histories

On the Temporalities of the Media Event

Penelope Papailias

At 10:30 am on 28 May 1999, an Albanian migrant worker, 24-year-old Flamur Pisli, known in Greece as “Antonis,” boarded a bus in a town at the outskirts of Thessaloniki where he had been living and working for several years. With a Kalashnikov rifle