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Ryan Goeckner, Sean M. Daley, Jordyn Gunville, and Christine M. Daley

culmination of an eight-month struggle between American Indian and allied protesters and law enforcement, private mercenaries, and state and federal government officials over the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) under Lake Oahe by the Texas

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Museums in the Pandemic

A Survey of Responses on the Current Crisis

Joanna Cobley, David Gaimster, Stephanie So, Ken Gorbey, Ken Arnold, Dominique Poulot, Bruno Brulon Soares, Nuala Morse, Laura Osorio Sunnucks, María de las Mercedes Martínez Milantchí, Alberto Serrano, Erica Lehrer, Shelley Ruth Butler, Nicky Levell, Anthony Shelton, Da (Linda) Kong, and Mingyuan Jiang

American Indian (NMAI), would be closed to the public on 14 March ( Daher 2020 ). On the same day, New Zealand's borders closed, and the tourism industry, so reliant on international visitors, choked. Museums previously deemed safe havens of society and

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The return of Pierre Proudhon

Property rights, crime, and the rules of law

Esther Kingston-Mann

This essay in comparative history considers how governing elites and rural publics have interpreted rules of law and criminal behavior in times of radical tenure transformation. During the twentieth century, Russians experienced three state-sponsored attempts at property rights revolution: firstly, the pre-1917 Stolypin Reforms to privatize the ubiquitous peasant communes, secondly, Stalin’s 1930s campaign to forcibly collectivized peasant communes, and thirdly, the 1990s ‘shock therapy’ reforms to replace Soviet collectivism with wholesale privatization. In each case, adherents of the pre-existing property systems were excluded from the decision-making process that established the new one. Russia’s historical experience is viewed in light of the contested emergence of private property regimes during England’s enclosure movement, and during the nineteenth-century Euro- pean settler appropriation of American Indian land as private property—with African-born plantation workers also later claimed as private property. In some cases, resistance was viewed as criminal; in others, it was punishable as treason.

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Tao Zhang

Despite some scholarly attention, the Native-American–Chinese association is mainly studied from the White perspective. One may get the impression that connections between the two similarly marginalized groups are either imagined or promoted by Whites for their own benefit. But, as a matter of fact, American Indians, joined by their White friends, did initiate associations with the Chinese out of their own racial considerations. One case in point is Pan-Indians’ reference to the Chinese in the process of forging a united and unique identity for the Indian race at the turn of the twentieth century. With those allusions, Native Americans were constructed into a group that was exceptional and progressive, benevolent and cosmopolitan—in short, a group that Whites should accept and respect as fellow Americans. Passively involved in proving Indians’ eligibility for American nationality, the Chinese emerged as racialized but less repugnant than they had been in Whites’ racist depictions. Pan-Indians’ citation of the Chinese thus registers the caution with which they navigated the constraints imposed by American racism in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

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Righting Names

The Importance of Native American Philosophies of Naming for Environmental Justice

Rebekah Sinclair

A name is a site of power. This is true in part because of the concrete power—often political, hierarchical, statist, and colonial—that determines who gets to name whom. But for many American Indian philosophies, names also come with their own power

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Collecting and Memory

A Study of Travel Archives

Lee Arnold and Thomas van der Walt

, using the example of the archives of William Drummond Stewart, a world traveler from Scotland. Even as he traveled extensively in Russia, Egypt, and Turkey, it was the American West (and AmericanIndians” 2 in particular) that caught his fancy

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Invoking a World of Ideas

Theory and Interpretation in the Justification of Colonialism

David Boucher

Colonialism: The ‘Requirement’ ( Requerimiento ) The ethical issues raised by the Spanish encounters with American Indians had plagued enthusiasts and opponents of the Conquistadors since Spanish relations with the infidel began and was the continuation of a

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Decolonizing Development in Diné Bikeyah

Resource Extraction, Anti-Capitalism, and Relational Futures

Melanie K. Yazzie

organize large-scale resistance to resource extraction. Native American studies is a diverse and prolific field that belongs to a much longer American Indian intellectual tradition with roots at the turn of the twentieth century, when Native thinkers like

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Activist Anthropology with the Haudenosaunee

Theoretical and Practical Insights from the Two Row Wampum Renewal Campaign

Brooke Hansen and Jack Rossen

-Kanentiio 2000 ; Hill 2014 ; Jemison 2000 ; Lyons 1992 ; Powless 2000 ; Thomas 1994 ). As Tuscarora historian Richard W. Hill, Sr, states in Nation to Nation: Treaties Between the United States and American Indian Nations , ‘a treaty is not solely words of

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Hunting for Justice

An Indigenous Critique of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation

Lauren Eichler and David Baumeister

Place 2012; Gombay 2014 ; Kulchyski and Tester 2007 ; Sandlos 2007 ; Schneider 2013 ), we contend that the principles of the NAM, along with the ontological assumptions that they rest on, are antithetical to American Indian views of property