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Freedom, Salvation, Redemption

Theologies of Political Asylum

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Christianity to both be and not be a religion, legally speaking (see Hurd and Sullivan 2021 ). As Sullivan explains, “law is both Christian and not Christian. That doubleness enables American exceptionalism in very specific ways” ( Sullivan 2021: 191 ). This

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Culture Constraints of High-Speed Rail in the United States

A Perspective from American Exceptionalism

Zhenhua Chen

The development of high-speed rail (HSR) infrastructure in the United States faces a great challenge given concerns of economic viability and political complexity. However, an in-depth investigation reveals that some of these challenges and complexities regarding high-speed rail mobility can be elucidated by historical and cultural characteristics that affect daily behavior, lifestyle, and public attitudes in U.S. society. This essay discusses the debate on the U.S. high-speed rail development policy from the perspective of American exceptionalism. Through an exploration of the four traits of American exceptionalism, the essay argues that the stagnation of U.S. federal high-speed rail initiatives can be explained by U.S. cultural constraints: individualism, antistatism, populism, and egalitarianism. Unless more solid evidence is provided to convince the public about the benefits of HSR mobility, the HSR debate is likely to continue in the United States.

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Redemption Contests

Imperial Salvation and the Presence of the Dead

Kyle B. T. Lambelet

, and Ronald Reagan, US Americans have seen themselves as having a special destiny in ushering forth the ‘Kingdom of God’ ( Moorhead 1994 ). Rooted in a political theology of ‘American exceptionalism’ ( Torpey 2010 ), architects of the imperial

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The Schoolboy Sports Story

A Phenomenon and a Period Distinctive in the Cultural History of America

R.W. (Bob) Reising

Frank Merriwell’s time and was a force in shaping the values and priorities of America’s reading public. Two additional thrusts, comparable in impact, might well have warranted at least quick acknowledgement: Manifest Destiny and American Exceptionalism

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Discipline and Publish?

Transfers as Interdisciplinary Site

Cotten Seiler

flourished in the postwar UK, as well as feminist, poststructuralist, diasporic, postcolonial, and critical race theory. 1 The field has come to reject the frame of “American exceptionalism” and treat the United States as one of many national actors in the

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Teaching National Identity and Alterity

Nineteenth Century American Primary School Geography Textbooks

Bahar Gürsel

Myth of American Exceptionalism (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2009), 92–93. 41 Mitchell, First Lessons in Geography , 24. 42 Monteith, First Lessons in Geography (1875), 29, Baldwin Library of Historical Children’s Literature, Special and

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Introduction: World Knowledge and Non-European Space

Nineteenth Century Geography Textbooks and Children’s Books

Andreas Weiß

Century American Primary School Geography Textbooks,” Bahar Gürsel focuses on the development of two prominent American geography textbooks before and after the Civil War. Not only did American exceptionalism become more important during this period, but

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Anti-social security

The changing contours of the hegemonic field in the twenty-first-century United States

Jeff Maskovsky

, Douglas S. 2009 . “ Globalization and inequality: Explaining American exceptionalism .” European Sociological Review 25 ( 1 ): 9 – 23 . 10.1093/esr/jcn036 Mathiesen , Thomas . 1997 . “ The viewer society: Michel Foucault's ‘panopticon’ revisited

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Actualising History

Responsibilities with Regard to the Future in Arthur Miller's The Crucible

Aamir Aziz and Frans Willem Korsten

-century American exceptionalism consisted of more than the odd remnant of old Puritan spiritual ideas about the Americans as God's chosen people, or Woodrow Wilson's belief in America's manifest destiny, a concept that long predated him, and the international

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Anastasia Todd

individualism—that has justified the dismantling of social services—as well as a steadfast commitment to “the integration of [the] most vulnerable ‘special’ citizens” ( Koshy 2001: 3 ). Ablenationalism is inextricable from the project and logic of American