Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 146 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

'Archive Man'

Stephen Poliakoff and the Archive

Elizabeth Robertson

The writer-director Stephen Poliakoff’s thematic concerns with history and memory have repeatedly returned to the archive as a site of discovery. Poliakoff’s use, and exploration, of archives in his work has coincided with a marked rise in mainstream cultural engagement with archives for personal use, as well as an archival turn in literary scholarship. This article explores the different types of archive and archival material found in Poliakoff’s dramas for stage and screen, mapping the topography of public and private archives in his work, in turn revealing the commentaries these dramas are making about how we create and use archives, and who and what they are for.

Restricted access

Découverte d'une archive

l'« Esquisse d'une théorie de la magie »

Jean-François Bert

Dans une livraison précédente de la revue, nous avions évoqué le cas particulier des archives de Marcel Mauss, désormais conservées à l’IMEC. Ce fonds d’archives retrace une grande part de la vie savante et politique de Marcel Mauss, mais également de celle d’Henri Hubert, son « jumeau de travail » décédé en 1927 et dont Mauss récupéra une partie des archives. Ces documents lui servirent, entre autres, pour terminer la publication, dans la collection « L’évolution de l’Humanité » dirigée par Henri Berr, des deux volumes que Hubert consacra à l’histoire des Celtes et des Germains (Bert, 2010).

Restricted access

Collecting and Memory

A Study of Travel Archives

Lee Arnold and Thomas van der Walt

People’s travel collections serve as a memory aid to help them write travelogues, novels, or scientific reports when they return home. They may also have merely been a way to document a voyage or journey for future generations. Under the surface of any of these end uses is simply the need to collect, the need to hold on to memory—in the form of material culture, ephemera, photographic documentation or assiduous note taking. Travel archives are the materials (either in manuscript form or printed ephemera) that document the purposeful travel of an individual or group. Like family papers, they may be perceived as having limited value beyond their fellow travelers or family members. Irrespective of the motivation of the traveler, these collections often end up in repositories. How an archivist deals with this material is crucial to its future use.

Restricted access

Elizabeth C. Macknight

This article presents two case studies, from Scotland and the Scottish Islands, of communities' engagement with archives and their attitudes toward heritage. The case studies arise out of knowledge transfer between an historian employed in an academic role at a Scottish university and two “third sector“ organizations. By comparing the perspectives of historians, archivists, and community organizations the article shows the different ways in which these separate interest groups perceive the value of archives. It then points to some of the possibilities and challenges of working collaboratively to deepen understanding about the past and to create wider opportunities, now and in the future, for historical interpretation, teaching, learning, and research. In the era of digital technologies, it is recommended that undergraduate students be taught the key concepts of archival theory and practice, while also being encouraged to experience working with original archival documents.

Restricted access

Jaimie Baron

In recent years, “the archive“ as both a concept and an object has been undergoing a transformation. The increased availability of still and video cameras, analog and then digital, has led to a proliferation of indexical documents outside of official archives and prompted questions about what constitutes an “archive,“ and, hence, what constitute “archival documents.“ At the same time, filmmakers are appropriating sounds and images from various sources, thereby breaking down the distinction between “found“ and “archival“ documents. This situation calls for a reformulation of the very notion of the archival document. This article reframes the archival document not as an object but as a spectatorial experience or a relationship between viewer and text. I contend that certain appropriated audiovisual documents produce for the viewer what I call the “archive effect“ and that this encounter endows these documents with a particular kind of authority as “evidence.“

Free access

W. S. F. Pickering

The Centre very much appreciates the donation of Mrs Margaret M. Jeffrey of English translations by her late husband, Professor William Jeffrey, Jr, of works written by Durkheim and his group, especially Mauss and Fauconnet. Professor Jeffrey was professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati for many years. It was while he was studying law at the University of Chicago that he came under the influence of teachers in sociology.

Restricted access

NOT Finding Women in the Archives

The Case of Evegeniia Serebrennikova, Pioneering Woman Physician in Late Nineteenth-Century Russia

Michelle DenBeste

This article examines the life of one early woman doctor, Evgeniia Serebrennikova (1854–1897), a graduate of the St. Petersburg women’s medical courses and an eye doctor in Perm. Serebrennikova established an eye clinic in Perm, wrote numerous articles, gave talks at medical conferences at home and abroad, and was a fixture in Perm’s philanthropic life. Despite these achievements, there are few traces of her in the archives. The article also discusses the author’s research trajectory and the difficulties involved in finding evidence about women such as Serebrennikova.

Restricted access

Cartographies of Communicability and the Anthropological Archive

Civil War Executions and the Harvard Irish Study

Brigittine French

This article traces ideological constructions of communication that enable powerful actors to determine what counts as silences, lies and surpluses in efficacious narratives about violence (Briggs 2007) in order to elucidate occlusions regarding legacies of the Civil War in the Irish Free State. It does so through a precise triangulation of multiple competing and overlapping narratives from unpublished fieldnotes, interviews, published ethnographies and other first-person accounts. The inquiry highlights social memories of the Irish Civil War that have been 'assumed, distorted, misunderstood, manipulated, underestimated, but most of all, ignored' (Dolan 2003: 2). The article argues that the excesses of the anthropological archive make the recuperation of a multiplicity of collective memories possible through a linguistic anthropological perspective that enumerates the kind of erasures at play in contentious memory-making moments, highlights polyvocality in metapragmatic discourse and tracks the gaps in entextualisation processes of historical narratives about political turmoil.

Restricted access

Les archives de Marcel Mauss ont-elles une spécificité?

Le cas de la collaboration de Marcel Mauss et Henri Hubert

Jean-François Bert

Les archives de Marcel Mauss, conservées à l’IMEC (Institut Mémoires de l’Edition Contemporaine), reflètent l’éclatement et le dépassement constant d’une pensée originale et curieuse touchant à la sociologie, à l’ethnographie ou encore à l’histoire des religions, mais aussi à la situation économique et politique et aux innovations sociales. On sait moins, en revanche, que ce fonds d’archives est double. Les archives de Marcel Mauss sont aussi celle de Henri Hubert. Un « jumeau de travail » que Mauss rencontra en 1896 à l’École pratique des hautes études et avec qui, par la suite, il produira une oeuvre théorique importante dont « l’Essai sur la nature et la fonction du sacrifice » ou « l’Esquisse d’une théorie générale de la magie ». Outre sa richesse documentaire, ce fonds d’archives invite aussi à explorer les processus de la créativité scientifique et, plus particulièrement, la difficile pratique de l’écriture à deux. C’est en tout cas ce que nous proposons de montrer à partir des notes, des correspondances et des manuscrits encore inédits conservés.

Restricted access

Silke-Maria Weineck

This essay concerns one of the strangest exhibits of all time: the display of Friedrich Nietzsche’s live body in Villa Silberblick, a house overlooking Weimar, the “City of European Culture” in 1999. Since Weimar’s self-representation is organized almost entirely around the glory of a handful of long-dead men and the public spaces devoted to them, the town might as well have declared itself “City of Museum Culture.” Indeed, its culture has been strange at times, and its contradictions are not all that badly summed up in the double meaning of Silberblick, which can mean both silver view and cross-eyed vision. In the story of Nietzsche’s final years we will encounter both the silvering and the squinting.