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Gendering Balkanisms

Gender, Culture, and Class in Nineteenth-Century Women's Travelogues in the Balkans

Marina Matešić

This article links nineteenth-century travelogues about the Balkans written by European women travelers—Dora d'Istria, Maria Karlova, Emily Strangford, and Paulina Irby and Georgina Mackenzie—both to a broader historical discourse called Balkanism and to the socio-historical contexts of the authors themselves. It examines the ways in which these texts adopted existing hegemonic dichotomies of Balkanism concerning culture, ethnicity/religion, and gender and whether they set new paths for Balkanist discourse. Written during the time of anti-Ottoman uprisings and nation-building movements, the travelogues expressed diverse humanitarian, Christian, feminist, anti-imperial/Turkish and other agendas and discussed the crucial role of (Balkan) women in it. Through a particular focus on domestic life and the lives of women, these women travelers also spoke of their own position in society, bringing to light their struggle for equality in traveling, writing, and participating in broader political and social life, and in that way disturbed the male-centered Balkanist discourse.

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Illyria Remembered

On Some French Memoirs of the Illyrian Provinces 1809–1813

David McCallam

stories of these memoirs. However, read together, they present “l'Illyrie” as a shimmering object of memory, more refracted than simply reflected, but one that provides significant insights into the ways the classic tropes of Balkanism emerge in France in

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Federica Tarabusi

us. I know the Balkans, and I could say that any excuse is a good one for pointing out hostility toward one of his fellow citizens … The unity of people here continues to be almost a mirage.” This apparently trivial episode weaving together emic and

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Introduction

The Presence of the Past in the Era of the Nation-State

Nicolas Argenti

order of things” to a “national order of things” implied a connection with the past as much as a break from it. 2 The workshop that gave birth to this publication, part of the Balkan Futures series of the British Schools at Athens and Ankara, was

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Wendy Bracewell and Alex Drace-Francis

In writings about travel, the Balkans appear most often as a place travelled to. Western writings about the Balkans revel in the different and the exotic, the violent and the primitive – traits that serve (or so commentators keep saying) as a foil to self-congratulatory definitions of the West as modern, progressive and rational. However, the Balkans have also long been travelled from. The region’s writers have offered accounts of their travels in the West and elsewhere, saying something in the process about themselves and their place in the world.

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A Woman Politician in the Cold War Balkans

From Biography to History

Krassimira Daskalova

way gender theory is usually done. On this see, the fine analysis of the Australian scholar Raewyn Connell, Southern Theory: Social Science and the Global Dynamics of Knowledge (Cambridge: Polity, 2007). From the position of the (Balkan

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An Amazon Warrior, a Chaste Maiden or a Social Man?

Early Ethnographic Accounts of the Balkan Man-Woman

Aleksandra Djajić Horváth

This article looks into the representations of the figure of the Balkan man-woman in missionary and travel accounts from the turn of the twentieth century. I read these early proto-ethnographic texts, both written and visual, dialogically – as points of intersection between observers and the observed, with the aim of addressing the question of how professional transgressors – travellers and missionaries – perceived and culturally ‘translated’ female gender-transgressors who were enjoying the role and status of social men in northern Albanian and Montenegrin societies, and whose gender identity was heavily based on their daily performance of male chores and on the possession of male privileges, such as smoking, socialising with men and wearing arms.

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Women and War in the Balkans

A Comparative Review Essay

Maria Bucur

Balkan Wars or the two world wars in Eastern Europe was a strictly masculine affair. In the past decade, scholars have produced a number of studies that generate a more nuanced understanding of what living through total war meant in Balkan societies in

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Jeremy F. Walton and Piro Rexhepi

specific successor nation-states: Kosovo, Macedonia, Croatia, and Slovenia. We have chosen this constellation of post-Yugoslav states strategically. 2 In general, treatments of Islam in the western Balkans privilege Bosnia, and Sarajevo in particular

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Annita Panaretou

Under this rubric, Journeys presents Dr Annita Panaretou's assessment of the character of Greek travel writing and its place in a wider Balkan and European context, and a discussion of her position by three other scholars. The debate raises questions that go well beyond the immediate problem posed by the Greek case. What are the roles of history, ideology and emotion in the construction of identities? How does travel writing serve as a site in which these can be expressed, constructed and negotiated? And how, in the light of such issues, should we study particular national travel-writing traditions?