Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 48 items for :

  • "Barack Obama" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Germany and the United States

Whither “Partners in Leadership”?

Matthew Rhodes

Before a farewell trip to Berlin in November 2016, (a sixth to Germany while in office) u.s . President Barack Obama hailed Chancellor Angela Merkel as his “closest international partner.” 1 Indeed, the confluence of calibrated u

Restricted access

Thierry Chopin

External geopolitical developments and the role of the United States have been particularly important in the creation and orientation of the European integration. This study appraises the outlook of transatlantic relations in the wake of Barack Obama's 2008 election and the entry into force of the Lisbon Treaty. It is argued that whereas these developments on both sides of the Atlantic could provide for a window of opportunity to shift bilateral relations into higher gear, success will eventually depend on Europe's internal capacity to approach the US with collective and united answers to the main contemporary international challenges.

Full access

Emiliano Alessandri

Despite Silvio Berlusconi’s much-publicized friendship with US President

George W. Bush, the election of Barack Obama in November 2008

did not lead to any appreciable deterioration of US-Italy relations. The

clash of personalities and “ideologies” that some had predicted did not

materialize. The two leaders soon established a cordial and pragmatic

relationship. The emphasis on continuity, however, did not deter

change. In fact, the shift in priorities and approach brought about by

the Obama administration during its first year in office altered the context

within which Italian foreign policy was carried out. New opportunities

opened up as Italy’s engagement with Russia and Iran, which

had attracted criticism in the past, also became the stated goal of the

US government. At the same time, Italian foreign policy was faced

with new constraints as Obama’s new course combined US leadership

with coordination, expecting European allies to consult with Washington

on dossiers having both national and transatlantic dimensions.

Restricted access

Debate

Religion and Violence

William T. Cavanaugh, Wendy James, and Paul Richards

It is much easier these days to find people who think that Barack Obama was born in Kenya than it is to find Westerners who deny that religion has a peculiar tendency to promote violence. This latter idea is widespread, from the common person in the street to political theorists who assure us that liberal politics arose to save us from the violence that religion would foster if left untamed in the public sphere. The violence of religion is more than a history lesson, we are told; with the rise of Islamic radicalism and other forms of illiberal politics, we are threatened today with the kinds of religious violence that the West successfully domesticated in the early modern period. In this brief essay, I will raise doubts about this prevalent tale that we in the secular age like to tell ourselves.

Free access

Christine McCourt

The year 2012 saw a number of major events that featured anthropology in some form. On a global scale, these included continuing national and international economic crises and depression, the re-election of Barack Obama in the U.S. and his nomination of Dr Jim Yong Kim for Presidency of the World Bank. Dr Kim (with a PhD from Harvard in 1993) was the first anthropologist (and medical doctor) to head the World Bank and one of the few anthropologists to work for the Bank, whose leaders and ranks are largely economists. Obama was the president dubbed an anthropologist as a form of populist or anti-intellectualist critique (McCourt 2012), providing an illuminating vision of the, oft en negative, popular view of anthropology as well as other disciplines.

Free access

Christine McCourt

In opening this 2009 volume of Anthropology in Action, it seems important to comment on what are self-consciously interesting times. The first quarter of the year has already witnessed the inauguration of Barack Obama as US president, bitter and destructive bombing campaigns in Gaza, and further financial shocks in the world’s markets, with a seeming domino effect of wealthy capitalist institutions turning to national governments for support. Global and local relations, networks, identities and conflicts have been brought into sharp focus by world events, but anthropology is rarely visible in the news, and anthropologists rarely called upon to comment, despite a wealth of potentially valuable knowledge. Applications of anthropology are becoming gradually more accepted within the academy, but seem to have come only a short distance in terms of public profile or ability to influence national and trans-national policies.

Restricted access

Ruth Hatlapa and Andrei S. Markovits

There is no question that with Barack Obama the United States has a rock star as president who—behooving rock stars—is adored and admired the world over. His being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize nary a year after being elected president and barely ten months into his holding the office, testified to his global popularity rather than his actual accomplishments, which may well turn out to be unique and formidable. And it is equally evident that few—if any—American presidents were more reviled, disdained and distrusted all across the globe than George W. Bush, Obama's immediate predecessor. Indeed, the contrast between the hatred for the former and the admiration for the latter might lead to the impression that the negative attitudes towards America and Americans that was so prevalent during the Bush years have miraculously morphed into a lovefest towards the United States on the part of the global public. This paper—concentrating solely on the German case but representing a larger research project encompassing much of Western Europe—argues that love for Obama and disdain for America are not only perfectly compatible but that, in fact, the two are merely different empirical manifestations of a conceptually singular view of America. Far from being mutually exclusive, these two strains are highly congruent, indeed complementary and symbiotic with each other.

Open access

David Lempert

our discipline link anthropology directly to policies of the former US President Barack Obama 1 , whose mother was an anthropologist, as well as his half-sister. This essay examines the allegations made in a recent book by journalist Wayne Madsen

Free access

Frédéric Viguier

this political expertise first became apparent during the 2008 presidential election, when Barack Obama put together a campaign team of over fifty people, who bolstered campaign volunteering, electoral door-to-door canvassing, and eventually, voter

Restricted access

Taras Fedirko and Marlene Schäfers

) reorientation of knowledge. Miyazaki, in his turn, compares Barack Obama’s speeches on hope with statements of Pope Benedict XVI, seeking to capture moments in which hope is replicated from one terrain to another, in order to understand it as a reorientation of