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Alena Minchenia

For more than 25 years, Belarusian political activists have been struggling to challenge the power of the current president, Aliaksandr Lukashenka. Studies of the dynamics of political contestation in Belarus have a certain pattern: they tend to

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Narrating the Second World War

History Textbooks and Nation Building in Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine

Lina Klymenko

history textbooks of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. The focus on national identity construction in the post-Soviet context is interesting for the following reasons. The Soviet Union—often referred to as a multinational federation or empire—disintegrated in

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Evert Van de Vliert

.198 −0.812 Argentina 0.106 0.402 0.992 0.419 Armenia 1.138 −0.792 −0.956 −0.913 Australia 0.579 1.315 0.688 1.980 Austria 0.880 1.347 0.627 1.599 Azerbaijan 1.138 −0.765 −0.767 −1.662 Bangladesh −0.798 −1.373 −1.252 −0.939 Belarus 1.654 −0.247 0.257 −1

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Larissa Titarenko

There is a stereotype that such former Soviet republics as Russia, Ukraine and Belarus are totally Orthodox. However, this statement is not entirely correct, as part of the population in these countries belong to many different churches, while a large part have rather eclectic religious and para-religious beliefs. In the case of Belarus, a major part of the population belongs to two Christian confessions, Orthodox and Catholic, while many other confessions and new religious movements also exist. Religious pluralism is a practical reality in Belarus which has the reputation of the most religiously tolerant post-Soviet country. Contemporary laws provide the legal basis for the tolerant relations in the country, and there is a historical tradition of religious tolerance in Belarus. Research data from the EVS studies and national surveys are used.

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Surviving Dehumanizing Times

Life Journeys across Borderlands of Memory and Deception; Michal Giedroyc and Ryszard Kapuscinski

Ignacy-Marek Kaminski

This article combines an auto-ethnographic approach with literary criticism and applied anthropology. It is about the lives of two men whose journeys through the major events of the twentieth century via different routes and moral choices suggest that literary ends do not always justify the means. Ryszard Kapuscinski (1932-2007), a world-renowned Polish journalist-turned-bestselling author, personally witnessed twenty-seven revolutions and military coups. His travel accounts stretch over five continents and have been widely recognized for their poignant dissection of the human condition. However, recent biographical details and examination of Kapuscinski's reporting methods by social researchers and field anthropologists have raised questions about the credibility and ethics of his works. By comparing his lifework and that of the lesser known Polish cross-cultural traveler exiled to Britain, author Michal Giedroyc (b. 1929), this article contextualizes political and personal dilemmas of both writers. They were born 150 kilometers apart in the multi-ethnic eastern Polish borderlands (now in Lithuania and Belarus). Their childhoods were similarly traumatized by the Nazi-Soviet division of Poland in September 1939. Both of their life journeys brought them into a united Europe in 2005 as Polish and British citizens, respectively.

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Marie-France Gaunard-Anderson

*Full article is in French

English abstract: The Western Bug is one of the major border rivers in Central and Eastern Europe. It is the border between Poland and Ukraine and between Poland and Belarus, but at the same time it is one of the European Union's external borders. Despite this particular position and a certain number of political, legal, economic and human barriers, cross-border cooperation is improving in order to preserve water resources and promote better management. This article illustrates the main steps that lead to this cooperation and seeks to analyze whether it will be possible to set up common management of the Bug river basin.

Spanish abstract: El Bug occidental es uno de los ríos más importante en Europa central y oriental ya que sirve como límite entre Polonia y Ucrania, Polonia y Bielorusia, y como frontera externa a la Unión Europea. A pesar de esta situación particular y de los numerosos obstáculos que superar (políticos, jurídicos, económicos y humanos), la cooperación transfronteriza avanza para preservar el recurso agua y gestionar mejor la cuenca hidrográfica del Bug. El artículo presenta las principales etapas de esta cooperación, las medidas implementadas y, analizando los principales obstáculos al establecimiento de una política común, se interroga sobre la posibilidad de una gestión conjunta en la cuenca del Bug.

French abstract: Le Bug occidental est une des principales rivières frontières en Europe centrale et orientale. Elle sert non seulement de limite entre la Pologne et l'Ukraine, la Pologne et la Biélorussie, mais aussi de frontière externe à l'Union européenne. Malgré cette position particulière et les nombreux obstacles à surmonter (politique, juridique, économique et humain), la coopération transfrontalière progresse en vue de préserver la ressource en eau et de mieux gérer le bassin hydrographique du Bug. L'article présente les principales étapes de cette coopération, les moyens mis en œuvre et s'interroge sur la possibilité de gérer en commun le bassin du Bug en analysant les principaux obstacles à la mise en place d'une politique commune.

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The Task of the Hebrew Translation

Reading into Othello’s Indian/Iudean Crux in the First Hebrew Translation

Eran Tzelgov

-day Belarus), was a leading figure of the Haskalah. He was a maskilic essayist and novelist. In 1868 in Vienna, Smolenskin founded and edited the Hebrew journal Ha-Shaḥar , which became the most important Hebrew medium of the late Haskalah and of the nascent

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The Ukrainian divide

The power of historical narratives, imagined communities, and collective memories

Alina Penkala, Ilse Derluyn, and Ine Lietaert

and Memory in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus . Palgrave Macmillan Memory Studies . 10.1007/978-3-319-66523-8 Fournier , A. ( 2002 ). Mapping identities: Russian resistance to linguistic Ukrainianisation in Central and Eastern Ukraine . Europe

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Nadzeya Husakouskaya

signifier ‘Europe’ remains a very vague imaginary in transgender people's accounts, offering a perception of it as narrowed to a set of countries such as Germany, France and Denmark. Then, neighbouring countries such as Moldova or Belarus appear to be more

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Valeriy Heyets

.3 6.3 −15.0 14.0 23.4 ** +9.4 4.4 3.9 −0.5 0.694 0.813 +17.1 Croatia 12.6 * 22.7 1.8 32.7 57.5 1.8 11.1 10.8 −0.3 20.9 19.5 ‡ −1.4 3.5 4.5 +1.0 0.670 0.831 +24.0 Belarus 8.4 17