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Federica Tarabusi

etic understandings of Bosnia-Herzegovina 1 provides a foretaste of the relations between “internationals” and “locals” 2 that constitute a running theme throughout this article. First, it indicates how deeply the settlement of international

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Conjuring “the people”

The 2013 Babylution protests and desire for political transformation in postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

Larisa Kurtović

obscured in the phrase “baby revolution.” Babylution within and without Dayton nationalism The dispute over the JMBG numbers began in May 2011, when the Constitutional Court of Bosnia-Herzegovina declared the current law unconstitutional because of

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Hospitality as Diplomacy in Post-Cosmopolitan Urban Spaces

Dervish Lodges and Sofra-Diplomacy in Post-War Bosnia-Herzegovina

David Henig

Egypt, Lebanon and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Yet this vignette also reveals that at the heart of social life in the dervish lodge lie myriad practices of mediation between various realms, be they between the realms of extraordinary and ordinary, hosts and

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Laurie Kain Hart

ground zero conflict regions in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Peru, Cyprus, and elsewhere (see, e.g., Bougarel et al. 2007 ; Bryant, 2010 , 2014 ; Kolind 2008 ; Papadakis 2005 ; Theidon 2013 ) draw attention to the material processes of entropy and building

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Tracing creative moments

The emergence of translocal dervish cults in Bosnia-Herzegovina

David Henig

In postsocialist and postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina, popular dervish cults are re-emerging after several decades of (semi)clandestine existence due to official bans and repression imposed by the Yugoslav state socialist governmentality. This article explores how an absence of divine knowledge ensuing from this disruptive history—strongly felt among various Bosnian dervishes today—is transformed into spiritual creativity and an improvisatory dynamic mediated by charismatic sheikhs. It traces “creative moments” leading toward the formation of a Bosnian dervish cult and its realignment with translocal networks of dervish lodges to explore the dynamics of divine knowledge and its creation inside these networks. The ethnography presented here suggests that we move a step beyond mere sociological descriptions of how translocal cults are organized across distance to explore in a more nuanced way the historicity and the dynamics of how divine knowledge is (re)created and idiosyncratically appropriated within these networks.

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Troubled locations

Return, the life course, and transformations of 'home' in Bosnia-Herzegovina

Stef Jansen

This article confronts the nationalist and foreign interventionist discourses on 'home' in post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina with the everyday experiences of a category of persons who are perceived as the ultimate embodiment of the promised homecoming encapsulated in sedentarism: minority returnees. It ethnographically traces the initially mirroring movements of two households and their differential ways to overcome the effects of displacement as well as their insertion in broader transformations. Infusing the notion of 'home' with an eye for security in its widest sense, and, in particular, highlighting the importance of the life course, it investigates the significance of place through a contextualized household political economy of 'home'. In that way it explores the conditions in which certain remakings of 'home' come to be seen as more feasible than others.

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Wearing Hijab in Sarajevo

Dress Practices and the Islamic Revival in Post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina

Andreja Mesarič

This essay observes contemporary Islamic dress practices in Bosnia-Herzegovina as a catalyst throwing into relief various tensions within Bosnian society – not only between Bosniaks, Serbs and Croats, but among Bosniaks themselves. Based on fieldwork carried out in Sarajevo, it looks at how people employ notions of culture and tradition when justifying what types of Islamic dress, if any, are compatible with Bosnian modernity. The essay analyses how people selectively draw on fragments from the historical and ethnographic record when they argue for or against veiling, and shows how, even though many denounce veiling and particularly face veiling as foreign to Bosnia, women who veil themselves equally draw on notions of culture and tradition when justifying their dress choices to others. The essay highlights how competing visions of Islam play a role in the transformation of religious, ethnic and gender identities in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and argues that dress as a gendered bodily practice does not merely mark assumed essential differences between an imagined Bosnian and foreign Islam but serves as a crucial means of their construction.

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Prayer as a History

Of Witnesses, Martyrs, and Plural Pasts in Post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina

David Henig

part of highly nationalized political life in post-war Bosnia-Herzegovina. However, praying for a good afterlife for the souls ( duše ) of the martyrs also continues to be apprehended by Bosnian Muslims as part of the individual ethical conduct of being