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In Memoriam

Philippe Besnard (1942–2003)

W. S. F. Pickering

The British Centre for Durkheimian Studies has suffered a severe blow with the sad death of Philippe Besnard. He has continually supported the Centre from the time when it was founded in 1991, and indeed he might be called one of its ‘founding fathers’.

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Claudette Kennedy, W. S. F. Pickering and Nick Allen

The late Mrs Claudette Kennedy was a niece of Mauss and a great niece of Durkheim. On 1 September 1992, Bill Pickering (WP) and Nick Allen (NA) – of the then recently formed British Centre for Durkheimian Studies at the Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Oxford University – met Claudette Kennedy (CK) in her house in Oxford and recorded a conversation with her. She had certain firm memories of Emile Durkheim, her great uncle, but more of Marcel Mauss. In all probability, she was the only person then alive with such memories, especially those of Durkheim. Pierre Mauss might have had recollections of Marcel Mauss but his memory was said to be failing.

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Society, Morality, Embodiment

Tracing Durkheim's Legacy

Sondra L. Hausner

This issue of Durkheimian Studies presents the collective efforts of the participants of a workshop held in late 2017, the centenary anniversary of Émile Durkheim’s death, at the University of Oxford. The articles that emerged from it, published together in this special issue for the first time along with some new material, demonstrate a continuation of classic Durkheimian themes, but with contemporary approaches. First, they consider the role of action in the production of society. Second, they rely on authors’ own ethnographies: the contributors here engage with Durkheimian questions from the data of their own fieldsites. Third, effervescence, one of Durkheim’s most innovative contributions to sociology, is considered in depth, and in context: how do societies sustain themselves over time? Finally, what intellectual histories did Durkheim himself draw upon – and how can we better understand his conceptual contributions in light of these influences?

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In Memoriam

W. S. F. Pickering

William Watts Miller

ground for a Centre of Durkheimian Studies, and initiated, in ‘retirement’, the most productive period of his academic life. The British Centre for Durkheimian Studies, Oxford: 1991–2014 The centre was formed in October 1991, with its base in the