Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,627 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Mary P. Corcoran, Jane Gray, and Michel Peillon

This article aims to demonstrate the significant role children play in new suburban communities, and in particular, the extent to which their circuits of sociability contribute to social cohesion in the suburbs. The discussion is located within the field of sociology of childhood, which argues that children are active agents who help to create and sustain social bonds within their neighborhoods. Drawing on focus group discussions and short essays by children on “The place where I live,” we paint a picture of how suburban life is interpreted and experienced from a child's perspective. We argue that children develop a particular suburban sensibility that structures their view of their estate, the wider neighborhood, and the metropolitan core. Although children express considerable degrees of satisfaction with suburban life, they are critical of the forces that increasingly limit their access to suburban public space.

Restricted access

Yuval Gozansky

When the program The Eight ( Ha-Shminiya ) 1 began in 2005, it was the first locally produced, Hebrew-speaking daily drama for children ever aired in Israel. Produced by The Children’s Channel (TCC), a privately owned commercial network, the

Restricted access

Conflicts in Children’s Everyday Lives

Fresh Perspectives on Protracted Crisis in Lebanon

Erik van Ommering

’s political and security upheaval receives ample attention in both academic and media accounts, most publications fail to consider how conflict shapes the lives of young Lebanese. Similarly, the ways in which children and youth take part in producing and

Restricted access

Children Born of War

A European Research Network Exploring the Life Histories of a Hidden Population

Kimberley Anderson and Sophie Roupetz

University of Birmingham, Children Born of War (CHIBOW) is a network funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, under the Marie Sklodowska Curie grant agreement, 1 and will run until 2019. The focus of this network is to

Restricted access

Gargi Gangopadhyay

sphere have attracted academic attention only recently; of these phenomena, the changes affecting children and the ways in which urban stimuli altered Bengali childhood have been among the least studied. Parallel to the significant transformations in the

Restricted access

The Other Children of the French Republic

The Government of Kafala by the Institutions of Adoption

Aurélie Fillod-Chabaud

Research on adoptive parenthood in Europe pays little attention to the circulation of children between France and the Maghreb via the kafala, a fosterage system in Muslim law. However, the practices of the kafala system are constantly evolving

Open access

Women and children together and apart

Finding the time for social reproduction theory

Jan Newberry and Rachel Rosen

2018 ). A central aim of our joint work is to keep those positioned as women and those positioned as children within the frame. 1 We seek to understand children's active participation in the labor of social reproduction while bringing forward again

Restricted access

Children's Sociality

The Civilizing Project in the Danish Kindergarten

Karen Fog Olwig

The increasing institutionalization of childhood in Western societies has generated concern in the social sciences regarding the disciplinary and regulating regimes of institutions and their presumed constraints on children's social interaction. This article argues that institutions for children can also enable such social interaction. Drawing on Norbert Elias's proposal that child rearing entails a civilizing project, this article contends that being 'not-yet-civilized' enables children to draw on a wide range of emotions and bodily expressions that are unavailable to adults. Through an analysis of life stories narrated by Danish youths, it is shown that common grounds of interaction were established in early childhood, allowing them to turn this adultconstructed institution into a place of their own where they could develop a sense of sociality.

Restricted access

Paul H. Gobster

Ecological restoration is becoming an increasingly popular means of managing urban natural areas for human and environmental values. But although urban ecological restorations can foster unique, positive relationships between people and nature, the scope of these interactions is often restricted to particular activities and experiences, especially in city park settings. Drawing on personal experiences and research on urban park restorations in Chicago and San Francisco, I explore the phenomenon of this "museumification" in terms of its revision of landscape and land use history, how it presents nature through restoration design and implementation, and its potential impacts on the nature experiences of park users, particularly children. I conclude that although museum-type restorations might be necessary in some cases, alternative models for the management of urban natural areas may provide a better balance between goals of achieving authenticity in ecological restorations and authenticity of nature experiences.

Restricted access

Rethinking Children's Independent Mobility

Revealing Cultures of Children's Agentic and Imaginative Mobilities through Emil and the Detectives

Lesley Murray

The concept of “children's independent mobility,” which originates in a study carried out between 1971 and 1990, underpins much of the research on children's mobilities. The study used particular criteria, based on parental determination of children's abilities and freedoms, to construct a notion of independence. This article contributes to previous work challenging the assumptions underlying this conceptualization of independence and suggests a rethinking of children's mobilities to more firmly incorporate children's agency and imagination. It does so first by critically reviewing existing scholarship and second by engaging with an example of a fictional story, Emil and the Detectives, which itself sets out to privilege both of these key aspects of children's mobilities.