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Ted Nannicelli

. One just goes to the cinema, or watches a DVD on a home theater system, or opens a digitally encoded version of a movie and watches it on a laptop or tablet. So it seems. Behind this commonsense answer, however, are a number of complexities I bring

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Bonnie S. Kaufman

Review of Vicky Lebeau, CHILDHOOD AND CINEMA

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Todd Berliner

conceptual distinctions between my book and earlier examinations of Hollywood aesthetics, most notably David Bordwell's chapters on classical narration in two books, The Classical Hollywood Cinema ( Bordwell et al. 1985 ) and Narration in the Fiction Film

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Hubert I. Cohen

Review of András Bálint Kovács, SCREENING MODERNISM: EUROPEAN ART CINEMA, 1950–1980

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The Cine-Fist

Eisenstein’s Attractions, Mirror Neurons, and Contemporary Action Cinema

Maria Belodubrovskaya

Gunning’s “cinema of attractions,” a mode of filmmaking that, according to Gunning, was prevalent in the first decade of motion pictures. Since Gunning’s conception, developed in the 1980s, contrasts the cinema of attractions with the cinema of narrative

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The Aesthetics of Boredom

Slow Cinema and the Virtues of the Long Take in Once Upon a Time in Anatolia

Emre Çağlayan

As a leisure activity with pretense to entertainment and aesthetic stimulation, cinema can be seen as the antithesis of boredom. Few—if any—spectators afford the cinema in order to be bored. On the contrary, cinema suspends the desire to fill time

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Thatcher’s Sons?

1980s Boyhood in British Cinema, 2005–2010

Andy Pope

nostalgia and boyhood extends to British cinema. Their assertion that the boy “we meet in cultural narrative is … physically agile, fond of the outdoors” (2005: 2), indicates an elegiac response to boyhood, reflected in a number of contemporary British

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Patrick Ffrench

Sartre's recollection, in Les Mots, of his first visit to the cinema is a multi-layered and ambivalent text through which Sartre proposes a number of interlocking arguments: concerning the contrast between the 'sacred' space of the theatre and the non-ceremonial space of the cinema, between the theatre as associated with paternal authority, and the cinema as associated with a clandestine bond with the mother. But the text also sets up a quasi-sociological account of the public Sartre encounters in the cinema itself as revealing to him the truth of the social bond, a truth he expresses with the term 'adherence', and which he says he only rediscovered in his experience of being a prisoner in the Stalag in 1940. Rather than the basis of a sociological account of the social bond, which would seem at odds with Sartre's social philosophy, I read this as the expression of a desire for physical proximity. The space of the cinema thus develops a fantasy, and this is in continuity with the role of the cinema in the evolution traced in Les Mots, in which it is described as instigating a withdrawal into imaginary life and an indulgence in daydreaming. Through reference to Christian Metz and to Roland Barthes, whose essay 'En sortant du cinéma' is proposed as a parallel and a response to Sartre, I suggest that the 'true bond' of adherence which Sartre encounters is an unconscious rather than an epistemological truth.

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Delinquents, Savages, and Lovers

An Introduction to the Cinema of Boyhood

Jeffery P. Dennis

Introduces this special issue’s theme of “Boys and Cinema,” discussing the emergence of a specific, international cinema of boyhood in the early 1960s, and five main themes established within it by the late 1960s.

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Daisuke Miyao

The process of modernization in Japan appeared as a separation of the senses and remapping of the body, particularly privileging the sense of vision. How did the filmmakers, critics, and novelists in the 1920s and 1930s respond to such a reorganization of the body and the elevation of vision in the context of film culture? How did they formulate a cinematic discourse on remapping the body when the status of cinema was still in flux and its definition was debated? Focusing on cinematic commentary made by different writers, this article tackles these questions. Sato Haruo, Ozu Yasujiro, and Iwasaki Akira questioned the separation of the senses, which was often enforced by state. Inspired by German cinema released in Japan at that time, they explored the notion of the haptic in cinema and problematized the privileged sense of vision in this new visual medium.