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Jeffrey Herf

George Mosse wrote European intellectual and cultural history in a way that recast its meaning. Because he did so without a specific theoretical program, the extent of his accomplishment in this regard at times went unnoticed. He was a member of the remarkable generation of European refugee historians who together formed the core of the American study of European culture and ideas in the postwar era. For his contemporaries, such as H. Stuart Hughes, Peter Gay, Leonard Krieger, Carl Schorske, and Fritz Stern, writing European intellectual history meant two things. First, it was a salvage operation, an effort to recall and preserve the traditions of humanism and liberalism destroyed by fascism and Nazism. Second, and related to that task, it entailed writing about other intellectuals—philosophers, social theorists, and novelists and artists of the first rank—who represented the best that had been thought in Europe.

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Subversive Mobilities

The Copenhagen Riots, 1900–1919

Mikkel Thelle

The article approaches mobility through a cultural history of urban conflict. Using a case of “The Copenhagen Trouble,“ a series of riots in the Danish capital around 1900, a space of subversive mobilities is delineated. These turn-of-the-century riots points to a new pattern of mobile gathering, the swarm; to a new aspect of public action, the staging; and to new ways of configuring public space. These different components indicate an urban assemblage of subversion, and a new characterization of the “throwntogetherness“ of the modern public.

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Dhan Zunino Singh

Considering ‘urban mobility as an important everyday life practice that produces meaning and culture,’ the present review discusses underground railway history in cultural terms. Following Colin Divall and George Revill, culture is understood here as representations and practices, and the underground railway ‘as mediation between the imaginable and the material.’ This review does not cover the prolific literature about this topic, but gathers perspectives from within and beyond transport or mobility history to contribute to a historical and comparative assessment of spatial representations and practices related to the production and uses of this subterranean mode of transport. The sources of these perspectives are Benson Bobrick’s Labyrinths of Iron, Rosalind Williams’s Notes on the Underground, Michael Brooks’s Subway City, David Pike’s Subterranean Cities, and Andrew Jenks’s A Metro of the Mount.

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Elliot Neaman

Rudy Koshar, From Monuments to Traces; Artifacts of German Memory 1870-1990 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000)

Rudy Koshar, German Travel Cultures (New York/Oxford: Berg, 2000)

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Samuel Merrill

In Berlin’s U-Bahn an announcement cautions passengers: “Bitte beachten Sie beim Aussteigen die Lücke zwischen Zug und Bahnsteigkante.” This fastidious rendition of the London Underground’s “mind the gap” warning reveals audio equivalencies between the two transport networks. However, the more numerous curved platforms of the Underground—originally designed for the shorter trains of the past—mean that its gaps are more pronounced than those of the U-Bahn. When it comes to the cultural investigation of each city’s broader public transport histories and geographies, the reverse is true. Unlike in London, public transport in the German capital has escaped the significant scholarly attention of historians in recent years.

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Mary Beth Benbenek

Katie Knowles. 2014. Shakespeare’s Boys: A Cultural History. Palgrave Shakespeare Studies. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 9781137005366 (hb) 9781137005373 (e-bk)

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Worldly Tastes

Mobility and the Geographical Imaginaries of Interwar Australian Magazines

Victoria Kuttainen and Susann Liebich

traveling abroad, such as Angela Woollacott’s, have drawn on magazines as sources, rather than looking at them as objects of study. While such studies indirectly point to the significance of magazines in cultural history, they leave in question what these

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Dhan Zunino Singh

through, mostly negotiating individually although surrounded by others in a confined space. Films show the lack of an immediate social condemnation and how harassment can be legitimated by laugh. Cultural history helps to understand how experiences of

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Michael C Behrent and Eugenia C. Kiesling

Warren Breckman, Adventures of the Symbolic: Post-Marxism and Radical Democracy Review by Michael C. Behrent

Hugh Dauncey, French Cycling: A Social and Cultural History Review by Eugenia C. Kiesling

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Afterword

Reading, Writing and Literature in the Early Modern Age

Roger Chartier

The Introduction to this issue of Critical Survey by Sasha Roberts acutely and rigorously defines how the essays gathered here contribute towards the history of reading practices in Early Modern England. My aim in this Afterword is to underline in what ways the six articles in this edition enable us to penetrate deeper into the encounter between textual criticism and cultural history, or (in other words) between literature and history.