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Michael J. Richardson

information. I continued: “Hegemonic masculinity, and in particular the work of Raewyn Connell.” I got the job. The interviewers seemingly were content with the ways in which I was applying Connell's theorizations to my empirical work at the time: with men of

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Men and Masculinities the Journal

Raewyn Connell's Influence on its New Vision

Joseph D. Nelson, Tristan Bridges, and Kristen Barber

and Masculinities —explicate how key tenets of Raewyn Connell's scholarship advanced in her groundbreaking text, The Men and the Boys (2000), has informed our expanded vision of the journal, and we are elated to do so on the twentieth anniversary of

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Timothy Laurie, Catherine Driscoll, Liam Grealy, Shawna Tang, and Grace Sharkey

“Men are likely to be detached from the defence of patriarchy,” writes Raewyn Connell in The Men and The Boys, “in small numbers at a time, in a great variety of circumstances” ( Connell 2000: 210 ). Masculinity studies is a project quite unlike

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Boyz2Men

Male Migrants’ Attitudes to Homosexuality and What Age Has To Do with It

Katarzyna Wojnicka

In The Men and the Boys Raewyn Connell claims that one of the most significant factors in performing and (self-)defining masculinity is attitudes to and perceptions of non-heterosexuality, especially linked to male homosexuality, and “homophobia

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Marcus B. Weaver-Hightower

In the 20 years since I first read The Men and the Boys, Raewyn Connell's (2000) follow up and expansion to Masculinities (1995) , the physical book has grown nearly as decrepit as my middle-aged body. Its pages have come unglued and the

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Raewyn Connell

of Politics ( Connell 1971 ) suggests. But I also learned some psychoanalytic lessons about the role of emotion in consciousness and about the complexities of family dynamics. Sara Delamont (2020) rightly sees this project as a starting point for

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The Men and the Boys, Twenty Years On

Revisiting Raewyn Connell's Pivotal Text

Victoria Cann, Sebastián Madrid, Kopano Ratele, Anna Tarrant, Michael R.M. Ward, and Raewyn Connell

It is twenty years since the publication of Raewyn Connell's highly influential text The Men and the Boys . This book, building on feminist and pro-feminist perspectives of gender formation, was written over a ten-year period from the late 1980s

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Robert Morrell

I was 11 years old in 1967 when Raewyn Connell's first book, Politics of the Extreme Right (with Florence Gould) was brought out by Sydney University Press. I was not much interested in politics at that time and, in general, South Africans paid

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The Continual Relevance of The Men and the Boys, Twenty Years On

Revisiting Raewyn Connell’s Pivotal Text

Michael R.M. Ward, Kopano Ratele, Sebastián Madrid, Anna Tarrant, Victoria Cann, and Raewyn Connell

Following the launch of our first special issue in December 2020 (Cann et al. 2020) we are delighted to publish this second, linked issue. As evidence of the impact and dominance of Raewyn Connell’s ideas and their influence on the field, we received so many high-quality abstracts in response to our call for papers that we decided to create two collections. This second special issue of Boyhood Studies, An Interdisciplinary Journal, celebrates the twentieth anniversary of Raewyn Connell’s landmark text, The Men and the Boys (2000), and hosts a wide range of international and interdisciplinary authors to highlight the continued global relevance of the book and Connell’s work more widely. This issue continues this work by showcasing an impressive array of empirical research studies and reflection pieces by emerging and leading scholars that are guided by the original themes in The Men and the Boys.

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Global Narratives

Globalisation and Literary Studies

Liam Connell

One of post-colonialism’s enduring projects has been the attempt to describe or understand the discursive component of Empire. Founding texts such as Edward Said’s Orientalism, argued that a complementary and necessary culture of imperialism existed alongside the economic and political structures of colonisation. The claim of such work was that this culture discursively produced ideas about difference that justified the European subjugation of other races and made possible the political expansion of the European states. The attempts to extend this analysis to describe a current culture of globalisation have been limited and in some ways unsuccessful. Without repudiating the methods of post-colonialism, it is necessary to recognise that changes to the structures of international relations have seen an attendant shift in the accompanying patterns of discourse. While, undoubtedly, many of the discourses that animated colonisation remain in place, the disavowal of a continuity between globalisation and earlier imperialist or colonising phases of modernity is one of globalisation’s characteristic movements. It is, therefore, insufficient to simply identify the persistence of imperialist discourses, ‘without significant challenge’, in ways that are insensitive to new cultural formulations brought about by structural changes in international relations.