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Christian Bromberger

kitchen herbs ( sabzi ) generally appear in the makeup of most dishes and give the regional cuisine the green touch that is its hallmark. These preparations are usually associated with eggs, consumed in great quantities in a society where each rural family

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Jean-Pierre Poulain

La présence de Maxime Rodinson dans un numéro d' Anthropology of Middle East consacré à l'alimentation et la cuisine semble tout d'abord aller de soi. Elle se justifie par deux textes fameux : le premier de 1949 sur les documents arabes relatifs

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Editorial

Food and Cooking in the Middle East and North Africa

Éléonore Armanet and Christian Bromberger

. Mentioning Lebanese cuisine, Aida Kanafani-Zahar refers to allspice's fragrances, which dispel meat's miasma. Food textures and cooking processes are also major distinctive marks for culinary identities. In the Saharan oasis she studies, Marie-Luce Gélard

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De Berlin à la conquête du monde

L'irrésistible expansion du döner kebab

Stéphane de Tapia

Les brochures et le site officiel du ministère turc du Tourisme et de la Culture le répètent à l'envi dans toutes les langues utilisées à l'adresse du tourisme international : « la cuisine turque est la troisième du monde », se rangeant cependant

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Le “7 épices” libanais

Un substitut heureux au piment de Jamaïque ?

Aïda Kanafani-Zahar

importantes de la pharmacopée découvertes en Jamaïque, qui m'a aidée à comprendre l'esprit aromatique de la cuisine libanaise. Dans A Description of The Pimienta or Jamaica Pepper-Tree , Sloane met en évidence la complexité aromatique du piment de Jamaïque

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Afsaneh Hojabri

cultures’ ( Shafia 2013: 8 ). The following themes are picked up by the majority of the food writers to provide a background to Iranian culture for the Western audience. Iran's rich history. Persian cuisine is perceived and described as perhaps the

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From Chop Suey to Sushi, Champagne, and VIP Lounge

Culinary Entrepreneurship through Two Generations

Anne Krogstad

During the last twenty to thirty years, a quiet culinary transformation has been going on in Norway—one that is surprisingly unobtrusive and scarcely ever mentioned. Many Norwegians have acquired new eating habits and a multicultural cuisine, indicating acceptance and inquisitiveness—this in a country where just a few years ago red peppers were considered to be dubious vegetables. In this article, the entrepreneurship of a family that has stood behind much of this development—the ‘Wong’ family from Hong Kong—is analyzed. Criticizing the common emphasis on ethnicity and drawing instead upon a concept of ‘mixed embeddedness,’ the following aspects of the Wong family’s entrepreneurship are examined: niche expansion, cooperation strategies, management in a spatial context, concept development, clientele, personnel, and market positioning. To the degree that ethnicity is included, the suggestion is to study whether and how ethnicity, together with the other aspects mentioned, is relevant in the making of profit and control.

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Yngve Lithman

During the last twenty to thirty years, a quiet culinary transformation has been going on in Norway—one that is surprisingly unobtrusive and scarcely ever mentioned. Many Norwegians have acquired new eating habits and a multicultural cuisine, indicating acceptance and inquisitiveness—this in a country where just a few years ago red peppers were considered to be dubious vegetables. In this article, the entrepreneurship of a family that has stood behind much of this development—the ‘Wong’ family from Hong Kong—is analyzed. Criticizing the common emphasis on ethnicity and drawing instead upon a concept of ‘mixed embeddedness,’ the following aspects of the Wong family’s entrepreneurship are examined: niche expansion, cooperation strategies, management in a spatial context, concept development, clientele, personnel, and market positioning. To the degree that ethnicity is included, the suggestion is to study whether and how ethnicity, together with the other aspects mentioned, is relevant in the making of profit and control.

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Of Traiteurs and Tsars

Potel et Chabot and the Franco-Russian Alliance

Willa Z. Silverman

Between 1893 and 1901, the Parisian traiteur Potel et Chabot catered a series of gala meals celebrating the recent Franco-Russian alliance, which was heralded in France as ending its diplomatic isolation following the Franco-Prussian War. The firm was well adapted to the particularities of the unlikely alliance between Tsarist Russia and republican France. On the one hand, it represented a tradition of French luxury production, including haute cuisine, that the Third Republic was eager to promote. On the other, echoing the Republic’s championing of scientific and technological progress, it relied on innovative transportation and food conservation technologies, which it deployed spectacularly during a 1900 banquet for over twenty-two thousand French mayors, a modern “mega-event.” Culinary discourse therefore signaled, and palliated concerns about, the improbable nature of the alliance at the same time as it revealed important changes taking place in the catering profession.

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Raw liver, singed sheep's head, and boiled stomach pudding

Encounters with traditional Buriat cuisine

Sharon Hudgins

Indigenous to Inner Asia, Buriats are a formerly nomadic people who now reside in southern Siberia, in the areas east and west of Lake Baikal. Although settled members of the Russian Federation, their traditional cuisine reflects their nomadic roots. Milk and meat products - from horses, cattle, sheep, and goats - are still the two main components of the Buriats' diet, supplemented by wild and cultivated plants (primarily hardy grains and root vegetables). Despite living within the dominant Russian culture, some Buriats still retain their shamanistic beliefs and make offerings to deities or spirits when drinking alcohol or eating certain foods. They have also preserved their ritual methods of slaughtering and butchering livestock, as well as traditional ways of processing the meat.