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Autonomy and the Spaciousness of the Social in Denmark

The Conflict Between Ungdomshuset and Faderhuset

Stine Krøijer and Inger Sjørslev

This article is concerned with the idea of societal 'spaciousness' and its relationship to individual and collective autonomy. These issues are analyzed in the context of the eviction of a self-managed social center of left-radical activists in Copenhagen and the protests and public debate that followed. The authors find that societal spaciousness in Denmark is metaphorically associated with a house or a limited physical space. People should limit themselves in public space, as in a house, to 'make room' for all. Because youngsters are not conceived of as fully fledged political subjects who are able to conduct themselves appropriately in public space, they become a group of special concern. The authors argue that space should be conceived as a dimension of social relations, and that sociality relies on a temporal assemblage of people, things, and imaginaries with space.

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Times of Democracy

The Unavoidable Democracy of Mid-Nineteenth-Century Denmark

Anne Engelst Nørgaard

The epigraph above sprang from a newspaper established in Copenhagen in November 1848. As in many states in revolutionary Europe, several journals, newspapers, and associations emerged in the Danish monarchy responding to revolutionary events. 2 This

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Michael Alexander Ulfstjerne

Danish citizens are watching each other sing from inside their respective living rooms on prime-time flow television on DR1, a Danish public service channel. It is uncanny. Are living rooms not meant to be private? It is disorienting, and I am flat out

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Navigating the Politics of Anxiety

Moral Outrage, Responsiveness, and State Accountability in Denmark

Mette-Louise Johansen

This article explores how a group of state employees, mainly social workers and police officers, assess threats and seek to cope with a variety of conflicting interests in their efforts to counter violent extremism (CVE) in Denmark’s second city

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Nathalia Brichet

Introduction: A Greenlandic Gemstone Landscape in the Making In 1605, the king of Denmark-Norway sponsored three ships to explore the Greenlandic coast in response to rumours of mountains of silver and gold. The disappointment was huge among

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The Specter of Communism

Denmark, 1848

Bertel Nygaard

the Danish translation of the fiercely anticommunist tome Histoire du Communisme by the French economist Alfred Sudre. Ebeling conceived communism as the most menacing of all the subversive new phenomena of modern society and, in particular, the

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Mei Qu

-down pattern and a bottom-up pattern of building an international partnership selected from my fieldwork in a Danish university addressed as X University (XU). The article will present a rich description of how grassroots administrators facilitated

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‘The Good Citizen’

Balancing Moral Possibilities in Everyday Life between Sensation, Symptom and Healthcare Seeking

Sara Marie Hebsgaard Offersen, Peter Vedsted, and Rikke Sand Andersen

possibilities for acting as ‘a good citizen’ are reflected in the bodily practices of the Danish middle class, this article particularly pays attention to the ways in which notions of morality are embedded in perceptions of bodily sensations and thereby create

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Becoming what you are

Faith and freedom in a Danish Lutheran movement

Morten Axel Pedersen

Based on fieldwork in the Danish protestant movement Tidehverv, this article explores what it means to try to live one's life according to a neo‐orthodox Lutheran and explicitly Kierkegaard‐inspired theology, whose overarching existential, social and political ideal is always to be true to oneself. Departing from the seemingly paradoxical notion that the essence of living a genuinely Christian life is ‘to become what you are’, as a Tidehverv priest put it, I seek to pin down the distinct concept of character, and wider concepts of personhood and temporality, upon which this ‘fundamentalist existentialist’ theology and ethics rest. This will involve discussing in some detail a number of core Kierkegaardian concepts such as ‘the moment’ (), the ‘decision’ () and ‘the leap’ (), and making a preliminary attempt to contextualise Tidehverv's existentialist project within the wider political, religious and cultural history of the modern Danish nation state. In doing so, the article offers an exploration of the relationships between Lutheran concepts of character and political expression, and between the concept of Christian individual character and Danish national character.

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The Cartoon Controversy

Creating Muslims in a Danish Setting

Anja Kublitz

This article offers a situational analysis of the printing of cartoons about the Islamic Prophet in a Danish newspaper in 2005 and the ensuing demonstration by Danish Muslims. It suggests that rather than simply sparking protests, the 'cartoon controversy' created a space for possible actions and a political platform for Muslims all over the world. Based on a review of the historical development of the national Danish discourse on immigrants, the article conveys how the cartoon controversy became instrumental in transforming this discourse. As a major creative event, it not only ridiculed a dominant religious symbol but simultaneously created a space for the becoming of Muslims in Denmark and beyond.