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Colette Palamar

While increasing urbanization intensifies the need for ecological restoration in densely populated areas, projects implemented in urban settings are often beset with conflicts stemming from a mismatch between traditional restoration practices and social realities. As ecological restoration practitioners seek to protect and remediate urban ecosystems, I contend that the broad set of principles developed by the environmental justice movement can provide an excellent conceptual framework for integrating social ecologies into restoration plans. Successful integration is constrained, however, by a number of challenges both within the Principles of Environmental Justice and ecological restoration theory and practice. Using a case study of New York City's Green Guerillas community gardening program, I show how the principles can begin to be operationalized to provide an effective grounding methodology for the design, development, and implementation of urban restoration projects.

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Horst-Dietrich Elvers

Phil Brown. Toxic Exposures: Contested Illnesses and the Environmental Health Movement. New York: Columbia University Press, 2007.

David Naguib Pellow. Resisting Global Toxics: Transnational Movements for Environmental Justice. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007.

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Introduction

Indigenous Resurgence, Decolonization, and Movements for Environmental Justice

Jaskiran Dhillon

In multiple sites across the world, Indigenous peoples are leading political and social movements for environmental justice. In Indigenous North America, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe spearheaded the resistance against the Dakota Access Pipeline and

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Michael J. Lorr

Urban sociology and urban studies increasingly employ the idea of sustainability to explain, analyze, and critique city redevelopment. While the ambiguous and oxymoronic nature of sustainability goals has been extensively covered in the past, the current resurgence and popularity of the term “sustainability,“ especially under the aegis of “urban sustainability“ or “green“ cities, requires us to rethink the usefulness of sustainability as a concept for understanding and evaluating urban redevelopment. Confronting this challenge, this article reviews three of the most common theoretical approaches to sustainability, problematizes those approaches in the context of North American cities, and then provides a working definition of urban sustainability. Finally, the article recommends four plausible research hypotheses to guide future research on urban sustainability.

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Mino-Mnaamodzawin

Achieving Indigenous Environmental Justice in Canada

Deborah McGregor

“To think that Indigenous concepts of justice do not exist is Eurocentric thought.” —Wenona Victor Environmental justice (EJ) has several definitions but can generally be thought of as the equitable distribution of environmental burdens and benefits

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Righting Names

The Importance of Native American Philosophies of Naming for Environmental Justice

Rebekah Sinclair

environmental justice perspective? Because while settler colonialism is foremost about the ongoing dispossession of land ( Alfred 2012 ; Tuck and Yang 2012 ), it includes the ongoing imposition of Western “processes of ordering” the world that continually

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Unsettling the Land

Indigeneity, Ontology, and Hybridity in Settler Colonialism

Paul Berne Burow, Samara Brock, and Michael R. Dove

What are the stakes of different ontologies of land in settler colonialism and Indigenous movements for decolonization and environmental justice? Settler colonialism describes a structure of exogenous domination in which Indigenous inhabitants of a

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Organized criminals, human rights defenders, and oil companies

Weaponization of the RICO Act across jurisdictional borders

Lindsay Ofrias and Gordon Roecker

conversation by scientists responding to oil contamination or activists working on environmental justice to express concern about the disaster in Ecuador and raise skepticism about the lawsuit that was begun to try to clean it up. Barrett's (2015) book Law

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Mark A. Blumler

Montgomery, David R. 2007. Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Shiva, Vandana. 2008. Soil not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis. Cambridge MA: South End Press.

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Kathleen Osgood and Anna Bara

John McCannon, A History of the Arctic: Nature, Exploration and Exploitation Kathleen Osgood

Julian Agyeman and Yelena Ogneva-Himmerlberger, eds., Environmental Justice and Sustainability in the Former Soviet Union Anna Bara