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Mary N. Taylor

Since the early 1990s, language used to speak of cultural practices once thought of as "folklore" has become increasingly standardized around the term intangible heritage. Supranational intangible heritage policies promote a contradictory package that aims to preserve local identity and cultural diversity while promoting democratic values and economic development. Such efforts may contribute to the deployment of language that stresses mutual exclusivity and incommensurability, with important consequences for individual and group access to resources. This article examines these tensions with ethnographic attention to a Hungarian folk revival movement, illuminating how local histories of "heritage protection" meet with the global norm of heritage governance in complicated ways. I suggest the paradoxical predicament that both "liberal" notions of diversity and ethno-national boundaries are co-produced through a number of processes in late capitalism, most notably connected to changing relations of property and citizenship regimes.

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Amira Schiff

Official negotiations between parties in ethno-national conflicts too often result in a deadlock. In such cases, the initial consent of opposing parties to sit together at the negotiating table is considered, retrospectively, to be merely a technical and ultimately futile achievement. The numerous failures of negotiations in such conflicts highlight the importance of studying the relationship between the prenegotiation process, which initially brings the parties to the negotiating table, and the results of subsequent formal negotiations, especially in view of the basic premise of the conflict resolution field's 'process school', that is, that effective execution of prenegotiation functions is critical for successful negotiations. This article examines the prenegotiation phase in two recent cases: the dispute over Cyprus in 2004 and the 'Annapolis process' of 2007-2008.

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Dalit Simchai

This article focuses on the concept of identity by juxtaposing New Age philosophy and nationalism in the Israeli context. Based on my qualitative research, I deconstruct the Israeli New Age discourse on ethno-national identity and expose two approaches within this discourse. The more common one is the belief held by most Israelis, according to which ethno-national identity is a fundamental component of one's self. A second and much less prevalent view resembles New Age ideology outside Israel and conceives of ethno-national identities as a false social concept that separate people rather than unite them. My findings highlight the limits of New Age ideology as an alternative to the hegemonic culture in Israel. The difficulty that Israeli New Agers find in divorcing hegemonic conceptualizations demonstrates the centrality and power of ethno-national identity in Israel.

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Between Trauma and Healing

Tourism and Neoliberal Peace-Building in Divided Societies

John Nagle

Deeply divided societies that have undergone extreme civil violence are often framed as "collectively traumatized" or in a state of "melancholia." Such aetiologies support peace-building initiatives, which seek either to normalize society by forgetting the legacy of violence and starting anew or by engendering societal remembering to work through trauma and bring about societal healing and eventual "closure." Examining the case of Northern Ireland, this article considers how these discrepant processes regarding collective trauma have become bound with fierce ethnopolitical debates and counter-insurgency methods regarding how to promote the region to tourists. I argue that both approaches represent nostrums, which do little to support peace-building and are ultimately complementary with neoliberal designs concerning the relationship among tourism, economic prosperity and conflict-regulation. Discourses concerning "collective trauma" must therefore be viewed as political strategies to shape the nation, which are finally embodied in the tourist journey to "traumatized sites."

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Liminality and Missing Persons

Encountering the Missing in Postwar Bosnia-Herzegovina

Laura Huttunen

journalists all over the world (see, e.g., Bougarel, Helms, and Duijzings 2007 ; Cushman 2004 ; Denich 2005 ; Halpern and Kideckel 2000 ;), but these debates are beyond the scope of this article. What is clear, however, is that the rising ethnonationalisms

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“We Owe a Historical Debt to No One”

The Reappropriation of Photographic Images from a Museum Collection

Helen Mears

is its outcome reflect a tension between differing forms of Kachin ethnonationalism “at home” and “abroad”—between the paternalistic, territorially grounded forms of nationalism traditionally espoused and the more free-ranging, cosmopolitan, and cosmo

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Laurie Kain Hart

). With its reductivist hypersymbolism, hyperdefinition, and hyperawareness of the proximities of others, ethnonationalism disables this syncretic force of place-based life. The sector of local society that ‘wins’ thereby cuts its roots and loses its

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Liberation Autochthony

Namibian Veteran Politics and African Citizenship Claims

Lalli Metsola

, and access to resources. This version of exclusionary nationalism merits comparisons with “culturally” based variants of ethnonationalism and autochthony. Liberation History as the Basis of Inclusion and Exclusion During the course of

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Jeremy F. Walton and Piro Rexhepi

each of our four nation-states varies dramatically. In Croatia and Slovenia, Islam is marginal to ethno-national images of the nation, yet Muslim institutions have achieved a congenial, if ambivalent, place of multiculturalist recognition in Croatia

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The End Point of Zionism

Ethnocentrism and the Temple Mount

Tomer Persico

constant communication with the Israel police, demanding an easing of conditions for the ascent of Jewish worshippers to the Mount; some MKs ascend the Mount themselves. What we are witnessing here is not a religious revival but an ethnonational project