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Raili Põldsaar

Helmi Mäelo, Eesti naine läbi aegade: naise osa Eesti ühiskondlikus ja rahvuslikus arengus (The Estonian woman through time: the role of women in Estonian social and national development), Tallinn: Varrak, 1999, 287 pp., 122 EEK (hb) ISBN 9985-3-0276-1

Sirje Tamul, ed., Vita academica, vita feminea (Academic Life, Women’s Life), Tartu: Tartu University Press, 1999, 271 pp., ISBN 9985-56-460-X

Tiina Kirss, Ene Kõresaar and Marju Lauristin, eds., She Who Remembers Survives. Inter- preting Estonian Women’s Post-Soviet Life Stories, Tartu: Tartu University Press, 2004, 346 pp., ISBN 9985-56-835-4

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Francisco Martinez

Is fieldwork as anthropologists do it simply a method among others? This article disagrees, drawing on the concept of “serendipity” as introduced by German scholar Ina-Maria Greverus. Beyond the prescribed way of any method, anthropology’s specificity articulates as “discovery”, in this case: an unexpected discovery of remains of the Soviet past in Estonia, through the author’s family life.

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Reverse, restore, repeat!

Class, ethnicity, and the Russian-speaking miners of Estonia

Eeva Kesküla

In this article, I look at Russian-speaking miners' perception of their position in Estonian society, along with their moral economy. Former heroes, glorified for their class and ethnicity, they feel like a racialized underclass in neoliberal Estonia. Excluded from the nation on the basis of ethnicity, they try to maintain their dignity through the discourse of hard work as a basis for membership in society. Based on the longer-term analysis of Estonian history, I argue that the current outcome for the Russian-speaking working class is related to longer historical processes of class formation whereby each period in the Estonian history of the twentieth century seems to be the reversal of the previous one. I also argue for analysis of social change in Eastern Europe that does not focus solely on ethnicity but is linked to class formation processes.

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In Search of an Autobiographical Room of Her Own

First Estonian Feminist Lilli Suburg (1841–1923) as an Autobiographer

Eve Annuk

The first Estonian feminist, journalist, writer, and teacher Lilli Suburg (1841–1923) was an outstanding autobiographer who used accounts of her life as a part of her journalistic and literary practice. With the help of her autobiographical strategy she created her own textual space, which allowed her to assert the validity of her life experiences. Feminism was becoming increasingly widespread in Europe at the end of the nineteenth century and Suburg tried to introduce European ideas, including feminism, to the emerging Estonian intellectual audience. However, she did not find a receptive public for these ideas, owing to the conservatism of the local Baltic-German society and the Estonian national awakening. This article explores the autobiographical writings of Lilli Suburg and analyzes them in historical context, demonstrating how these texts enabled Suburg to create a unique textual space in which she gradually defined and legitimated her feminism.

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The Relocation of Transcendence

Using Schutz to Conceptualize the Nature Experiences of Secular People

David Thurfjell, Cecilie Rubow, Atko Remmel, and Henrik Ohlsson

Denmark, Estonia, and Sweden are, if measured by certain sociological criteria, considered to be three of the world’s most secular countries. Nature—forests, pristine beaches, and the countryside—plays a specific role in the allegedly secular discourse of the mainstream populations of these nations. Not only is it almost without exception deemed as a positive asset worthy of protection, it is also thought of as holding certain existential qualities. Based on ethnographic fieldwork and interviews, this article suggests that Alfred Schutz’s conceptualization of transcendence—further developed by Thomas Luckmann—can be used to describe the existential experiences in nature of contemporary secular people. The article results in a suggestion for an operational definition of transcendence.

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Aimar Ventsel

The conference, 'Generation P in the Tundra' (8–10 October 2004) was organised by the Estonian Literary Museum in Tartu. The topic of the conference was the young generation in Siberia in all of its facets. The title for the conference was inspired by the cult book Generation P by the Russian writer Victor Pelevin, who describes what he believes is the young, commercialised Pepsi generation in Russia, which has assimilated post-socialist consumerist culture.

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From an Economic Term to a Political Concept

The Conceptual Innovation of “Self-Management” in Soviet Estonia

Juhan Saharov

). The central example in this article is the conceptual innovation of “economic self-management” ( isemajandamine ) in the Soviet Socialist Republic of Estonia. 2 Originally used as a term in accounting in an individual enterprise in a socialist planned

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Introduction

Performance, Power, Exclusion, and Expansion in Anthropological Accounts of Protests

Aet Annist

) between 2003 and 2004 and since 2012, as well as on a more focused interest on the topic since 2017, I analyze the protests around logging and clear-cutting in Estonia, consisting largely of widespread online activities, lobby and legal efforts, and some

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Wind of Change

Separating Heads and Bodies in Eastern Europe

Tanel Rander

The First Blow I was born in the Soviet Union. I am Estonian. However, I hardly speak any Russian and instead have spoken English since I was eight years old. Was I a Soviet kid or an Estonian kid? Probably both. But I feel disgust speaking in

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To Whom Does History Belong?

The Theatre of Memory in Post-Soviet Russia, Estonia and Georgia

Francisco Martínez

The history of the people belongs to the Tsar ( Karamzin 1969: xvi ). Memory is not an instrument for exploring the past but its theatre ( Benjamin 1979: 314 ). A Past That Is Not Perfect In January 2017 the ambassadors of Estonia, Latvia and