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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Juliano Fiori

In this interview with Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh, Juliano Fiori—Head of Studies (Humanitarian Affairs) at Save the Children—reflects on Eurocentrism and coloniality in studies of and responses to migration. In the context of ongoing debates about the politics of knowledge and the urgency of anticolonial action, Fiori discusses the ideological and epistemological bases of responses to migration, the Western character of humanitarianism, the “localization of aid” agenda, and the political implications of new populisms of the Right.

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Tintin and Corto Maltese

The European Adventurer Meets the Colonial Other

Dani Filc

The Tintin and Corto Maltese series are among the most famous European adventure comics. The adventure genre – both in novels and comics – is deeply related to nineteenth-century colonialism. This article compares the ways in which colonialism and the relationship to the colonial Other appear in Hergé’s and Pratt’s creations, focusing on Tintin and Corto Maltese’s adventures in Africa and Latin America. The comparison between Tintin and Corto shows that although Hergé developed an ambivalent view of European colonialism, Eurocentrism is constant through all his work. Pratt’s Corto, in contrast, shows a more critical, though ambiguous, view of colonialism, and a more egalitarian, though also ambivalent, conceptualisation of the colonial Other.

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Teaching internationalisation?

Surveying the lack of pedagogical and theoretical diversity in American International Relations

Christopher R. Cook

power to make their own rational choices based on free will. In Hobson’s (2012) examination of Eurocentrism in world politics, agency is often denied to the global south either inherently or contingently. Inherent means that those in the West are the

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Decolonial Approaches to Refugee Migration

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab in Conversation

Nof Nasser-Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab

In this conversation, Nof Nasser Eddin and Nour Abu-Assab—the founders and directors of the Centre for Transnational Development and Collaboration (CTDC)—discuss the importance of decolonial approaches to studying refugee migration. In so doing, they draw on their research, consultancy, and advocacy work at CTDC, a London-based intersectional multidisciplinary Feminist Consultancy that focuses in particular on dynamics in Arabic-speaking countries and that has a goal to build communities and movements, through an approach that is both academic and grassroots-centred. CTDC attempts to bridge the gap between theory and practice through its innovative-ly transformative programmes, which include mentorship, educational programmes, trainings, and research.

Nof and Nour’s conversation took place in November 2019 and was structured by questions sent to them in advance by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh. What follows is a transcript of the conversation edited by Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh and Mette L. Berg.

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Enis Sulstarova

Eurocentrism, or the placing of European or Western civilization at the forefront of historical evolution, at least since the Renaissance; the notion that historical progress moves from religion toward secularism and science; and the idea of the nation as the

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Introduction

Recentering the South in Studies of Migration

Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

It has become increasingly mainstream to argue that redressing the Eurocentrism of migration studies requires a commitment to decentering global North knowledge. However, it is less clear whether this necessarily means “recentering the South.” Against this backdrop, this introduction starts by highlighting diverse ways that scholars, including the contributors to this special issue, have sought to redress Eurocentrism in migration studies: (1) examining the applicability of classical concepts and frameworks in the South; (2) filling blind spots by studying migration in the South and South-South migration; and (3) engaging critically with the geopolitics of knowledge production. The remainder of the introduction examines questions on decentering and recentering, different ways of conceptualizing the South, and—as a pressing concern with regard to knowledge production—the politics of citation. In so doing, the introduction critically delineates the contours of these debates, provides a frame for this volume, and sets out a number of key thematic and editorial priorities for Migration and Society moving forward.

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Elena Kovalaschina

This article examines the ideals of G. N. Potanin and N. M. Iadrintsev, who were the architects of the federalist Siberian oblastnichestvo movement of the second half of the 19th nineteenth century and beginning of the 20th twentieth century. In their day, the work of the oblastniki on the cultural specificity of native Siberian peoples had a great influence on popular opinion, on the popularization of ethnological theory, and on the general social and political credo to reform policy towards these people. The oblastniki rejected both ethnocentrism and Eurocentrism in the comparison of various peoples. Their eventual acceptance of cultural relativism, the idea of equality of cultural values between peoples, and need for a civil understanding of human history were all closely linked to their political program of promoting regionalism. Their regionalist idea put forth the idea that every social and cultural unit had the right to an independent existence and to have control over their own development.

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Dis-orienting Western Knowledge

Coloniality, Curriculum and Crisis

Zeus Leonardo

knowledge has made of us to which we no longer consent, the gift of colonialism must be returned with interest within a decolonial project that dis-orients the curriculum. In recent decades, multicultural reform has put a dent in Eurocentrism’s hold on the

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Lise Tannahill, Eliza Bourque Dandridge and Rachel Mizsei Ward

Planet Heru (1997) utterly fails the Afrofuturist project by confining its Black characters to Eurocentrism’s shadows. Blair Davis’s excellent endcap analyses not comics per se but rather the visual semiotics of Black superheroes and particularly their

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Contested Memory

Retrieving the Africanist (Liberatory) Conception of Non-racialism

Ndumiso Dladla

out of necessity in the first place a ‘critical negative’ task which expresses itself in practice as the critique of Eurocentrism, which he understands as ‘a pervasive bias located in modernity’s self-consciousness of itself. [Eurocentrism] is grounded