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European Judaism Editorial

Vol. 1 No. 1 Summer 1966

European Judaism

Mercifully the destruction of the European Jewish communities was not total, and at the close of the conflict about 20 per cent of the original population remained to face the future. In some countries, such as France, a high proportion of the total population survived, while in Britain the community was totally spared. Russian Jewry, though continuing its prewar isolation and despite losses from the German occupation, still lives on as a numerically substantial part of the Jewish people. The troubles in North Africa and the Middle East have forced an immigration from those areas into the European continent.

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European Bodies

Who Embodies europe? Explorations into the Construction of european Bodies

Anika Keinz and Paweł Lewicki

Is there a ‘european body’, 1 and how is europeanisation embodied? What is a ‘european body’ then? Jean Comaroff (1993) has once shown that: ‘nationality, culture and physical type are condensed into the language that [ … ] would mature

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Jonathan Magonet

the main emphasis within Jewish life on the former. Particularly in continental Europe Jewish communities have struggled to rebuild their infrastructure with the focus primarily on internal communal, welfare and social needs. Dr Baeck had spoken of the

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Prayer Book Reform in Europe, Continued

Bibliography and Developments in Progressive Jewish Liturgy, 1967–2015

Annette M. Boeckler

European Prayer Books 1967–2015, according to Country (Alphabetical Order) in Chronological Order Austria Gebete für Rosch Haschana und Jom Kippur . Or Chadasch–Movement for Progressive Judaism / Verantwortlich für den Inhalt: Henry G. Brandt

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Larisa Deriglazova

This article aims to reconsider the fluctuation and composition of feelings of belonging to Europe in Russia during the last twenty-five years. 1 This period is remarkable not only due to Russia’s own development, and search for a new identity out

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European Anthropology as a Fortuitous Accident?

Reflections on the Sustainability of the Field

Čarna Brković

Under what conditions can European anthropology exist today as an intellectual project? What kind of project is it and what kind of project could it become? In this article, I argue that European anthropology today emerges only provisionally: for

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The End of the European Honeymoon?

Refugees, Resentment and the Clash of Solidarities

Siobhan Kattago

If the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 meant the end of ideological divisions on the continent, the rise of right-wing populist and Eurosceptic parties portents the very opposite. The European

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Chaya Brasz

Liberal Jewish Synagogue – men and women sat together. This was in accordance with Dutch Christian church culture and something still far from accepted in Germany around 1930. Mixed seating in synagogues on the European continent in those days only existed

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Memorialising Europe

Revitalising and Reframing a 'Christian' Continent

Peter Jan Margry

In the economic and political unification process of Europe, the idea of the creation of a pan-European identity was put high on the political agenda. With the failure of this effort, the emphasis shifted to the apparently less fraught concept of 'shared cultural heritage'. This article analyses how the politically guided rediscovery of Europe's past has contributed to the creation of a 'Religion of Heritage', not only by raising up a political altar for cultural heritage, but also through the revitalisation, instrumentalisation and transformation of the Christian heritage, in order to try to memorialise and affirm a collective European identity based on its Christian past. In the context of this process, the network of European pilgrims' ways appears to have been an especially successful performative form of heritage creation, which has both dynamised Christian roots as a relevant trans-European form of civil religion that has taken shape, capitalising on the new religious and spiritual demands created by secularisation, and responded to the demand for shared - and Christian inspired - European values and meanings in times of uncertainty and crisis.

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Instrumental Europe

Practices of Daily Engagement with the European Union

Marysia Galbraith and Thomas M. Wilson

Religious organisations that secularise their community outreach to gain European Union (EU) funding, border-city residents whose consumption practices exploit cross-border economic disparities, EU member states that protect their domestic labour market by restricting access to legal work and medical care for citizens of new member states, recently admitted citizens who nevertheless take advantage of increased opportunities for mobility to improve their economic and social standing, and even in some cases use their scepticism about membership to promote their personal or national interests within the EU – all of these examples point to the complex and varied ways in which instrumentality figures in day-to-day dealings with the European Union. This special issue of AJEC seeks to contribute to the anthropological study of the European Union by examining ways in which various individuals, groups and institutions use the EU to pursue their political, economic and social goals at local, national and transnational levels within Europe.