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Yassaba’ or the Fear of Being Abandoned

Health Promotion Messages and Local Meanings in Guinea

Maria Cristina Manca

and gathering information through health promoters who were based in their own villages. In addition, we worked directly with the local population by holding small group sessions in which we discussed their fears and concerns about Ebola. Many of these

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Shades of Darkness

Silence, Risk and Fear among Tourists and Nepalis during Nepal's Civil War

Sharon Hepburn

The conflict between the Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and the Nepalese state, from 1996 until 2006, resulted in thousands of "disappeared" and dead Nepalis, and, especially after 9/11, a sharp decline in tourism in Nepal. Yet the tourists who came had good journeys. Based on ethnographic research, this article explores how these two worlds—of tourism, and the darkness of war, variously experienced—coexisted in the winter of 2002 in the lakeside resort of Pokhara. The article describes how the culture of silence that emerged during the war permeated interactions between Nepalis and visitors, and that there are shades of darkness as well as shades of fear. Situations are not black and white and people's experiences are contingent on contexts and backgrounds that are diverse and complex. Complementing studies of dark tourism, that is tourism about darkness, this is a study of tourism in darkness.

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Julian Hanich

This article explores the question of what we are actually afraid of when we are scared at the movies. It is usually claimed that our fear derives from our engagement with characters and our participation through thought, simulation, or make-believe in fearful situations of the filmic world. These standard accounts provide part of the explanation why we are afraid—this article complements them by showing that we often literally fear for ourselves as well. Concentrating on an anticipatory subspecies of cinematic fear dubbed “dread,” the article argues that we often fear a negative affective outcome, namely our own fearful experience of shock and/or horror that usually ends scenes of dread. By looking at viewers' action tendencies and actions proper activated in dreadful moments, the article suggests that we appraise scenes of dread as potentially harmful to our current (and even future) psychological well-being. Dread thus turns out to be a specific kind of metaemotion.

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Friederike Brühöfener

This article analyzes the reaction of the West German press to the powerful peace movement that gripped the Federal Republic of Germany between 1979 and 1984. Following NATO's double track decision and Russia's invasion of Afghanistan, thousands of pacifist and peace activists participated in rallies, meetings, and sit-ins to protest above all the politics of NATO. Unnerved by the amassing of nuclear, protesters expressed their fears and anxieties highly visible on placards and in pamphlets. This public display of “fear of atom” led to an intensive media debate about the validity and possible dangers of the protesters' emotionality. The press's coverage of the peace movement and the question of how protesters expressed their fears turned into a discussion over legitimate political participation.

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Living in a Culture of Fear (2005)

A Muslim Perspective

Sarah Joseph

For those who are not familiar with the Harry Potter series I apologize; however, I think that a very fine point about fear was made in the third book of the series, The Prisoner of Azkhaban. Harry is about to come up against a Boggart – a creature which has no shape of its own, it is a shape shifter. It takes on the shape of what you fear the most. Harry’s teacher, Professor Lupin, does not allow Harry to confront the Boggart and Harry is upset about this, concerned that Professor Lupin had thought him inadequate in the face of the challenge. However, Lupin assures Harry that he had just been concerned that Lord Voldemort – the Dark Lord – would appear in the classroom. Harry, however, says no – he was not afraid of Lord Voldemort, rather he was afraid of the Dementors, who drain away all happiness from living things. ‘Ah,’ says Lupin, ‘it seems that the thing you fear, is fear itself. Very wise Harry!’ Indeed, very wise Harry. Fear is a crippling emotion.

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Living in a Culture of Fear (2005)

A Jewish Perspective

Jeffrey Newman

The Danish philosopher, Soren Kierkegaard, wrote of Abraham in ‘fear and trembling’. I am writing this with a sense of panic and terror and so, as always in such a situation, will need to proceed very slowly, taking great care, step by step. What is such fear about? I want to suggest that these feelings, or more accurately, some aspects of them, are inevitable in our human condition, that they are part of what has been called ‘primary anxiety’, which some see as inherent in our awareness of ourselves as mortal human beings.

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Freed from Sadness and Fear

Politics, COVID-19, and the New Germany

Michael Meng and Adam R. Seipp

on the capacity of humans to overcome the negative emotions of fear and sadness that keep them restricted to the narrow confines of their own selfish interests and views. The following section will offer some contemporary evidence to demonstrate the

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Liberal Whispers and Propaganda Fears

The American Jewish Committee and Israel’s Palestinian Minority, 1948–1966

Geoffrey P. Levin

belief that “discrimination against the Arab minority could endanger our struggle against anti-Jewish discrimination.” 12 AJC officials specifically feared that Israel’s treatment of the Arab minority would be used against American Jews amidst rising pro

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Vanessa Stjernborg, Mekonnen Tesfahuney, and Anders Wretstrand

This study focuses on Seved, a segregated and socioeconomically “poor” neighborhood in the city of Malmö in Sweden. It has attracted wide media coverage, a possible consequence of which is its increased stigmatization. The wide disparity between perceived or imagined fear and the actual incidence of, or exposure to, violence attests to the important role of the media in shaping mental maps and place images. Critical discourse analysis of daily newspaper articles shows that Seved is predominantly construed as unruly and a place of lawlessness. Mobility comprises an important aspect of the stigmatization of places, the politics of fear, and discourses of the “other.” In turn, place stigmatization, discourses of the other, and the politics of fear directly and indirectly affect mobility strategies of individuals and groups.

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The Origins and Subjects of Fear for Siberians

Sociological Research in the Regions of Eastern and Western Siberia

Valentin G. Nemirovskiy and Anna V. Nemirovskaya

This paper analyzes feelings of insecurity and fear amongst the population of Siberian regions in the face of various perceived dangers, based on research conducted in the Krasnoiarsk and Altai Territories, Novosibirsk and Omsk Regions, and the Republics of Khakassiia and Buriatiia, in the context of the general Russian situation. Quantitative methods—frequency, correlation, and factor analysis on survey data obtained from formalized face-to-face interviews—are used to gain an understanding of what factors respondents feel are “ugrozhaiushchie zhiznedeiatel'nosti” (activities threatening to social life). Siberians feel especially vulnerable to gender- and age-related discrimination, as well as governmental abuse of power and the threats inherent in economic development: chronic poverty, environmental threats, officials' arbitrariness, and crime and law enforcement authorities themselves. They also feel threatened by the presence of migrant groups and social minorities. However, an internal locus of control reduces their fears of threats to social life activities.