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Sensory Perception of Rock Art in East Siberia and the Far East

Soviet Archeological “Discoveries” and Indigenous Evenkis

Donatas Brandišauskas

Russian Far East. Starting in the eighteenth century, every famous expedition led by imperial explorers with ethnographic, archaeological, geographical, and historical interests of this remote and unexplored region also paid attention to rock art as

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Ryan Tucker Jones

In the years immediately after the Bolshevik Revolution, the Russian Far East's natural world took on heightened economic and political importance. 1 The weakness of the provisional governments and Soviet power had opened the region's oceans to

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Sergey Glebov

Vladimir Klavdievich Arsen'ev (1872–1930) emerged as arguably Russia's most popular writer whose works focused on the native peoples of Siberia and the Far East. His texts created a canonical image of a Siberian native. In Arsen'ev's writings

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Marina Fuchs

This article analyses the centre-periphery divergence over the Korean question in the Russian Far East, taking into account material from both Russian central and regional archives. The relative permeability of the frontiers in the Far East practically up to the 1950s and the heavy dependence of the Russian/Soviet Far East's economy on Manchurian commodity streams at least until the beginning of the 1930s gave this region a 'double periphery' character. After the act of judicial 'Sovietization' of the Russian Far East, the Bolsheviks initially tested a model wherein the 'political substance' of Bolshevism was developed on the old market economic framework, which had been adapted to the needs of the new regime mainly through reform measures and not with revolutionary sweep. However, the export-import orientation of the Dal'krai regional economy, which resulted from the region's economic separation from European Russia and its dependence on Manchurian and Pacific commodity markets, was not initially understood by its practitioners in Dal'krai as a retreat from Bolshevik doctrine, but rather as a variant of socialist economic principles applied to special conditions. The constant threat of political annexation and economic subordination by Japan, along with active Japanese and Chinese 'colonial engineering' on the frontier territories, forced the regional authorities to be guided to a considerable extent by foreign policy considerations in their search for solutions to internal issues. In this context, the Bolsheviks manifested appreciable 'central-regional' diversity towards the 'Korean question'. The analysis of the dynamics of this diversity from 1920 to 1929 supports the theoretical considerations of Terry Martin ('Peidmont principle') and Nick Baron (European 'governmentality') on the material of the Russian Far East.

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David Collins

In 1991 I published an annotated bibliography of English language publications about Siberia and the Russian Far East. The following list is the first part of a chronological extension of the original bibliography to the present. However, because of space and time considerations, there will be no annotations; items to do with foreign relations and shorter than six pages are usually omitted. I would be very grateful for information about any items which have escaped my attention, so that they can be included in a subsequent retrospective section.

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Hyun-Gwi Park

This article presents an ethnographic study of watermelon cultivators in the Russian Far East and how they approach and respond to climatic risk. For watermelon cultivators, the spatial boundaries of climatic risk are perceived as the baseline condition for the watermelon market, in which cultivators compete with each other by dealing with uncertainties caused by weather changes. While the market is linked to the spatial boundaries of climatic risk, this connection is only meaningful when there are weather changes that differently affect individuals within the boundary; weather changes that affect individual performance in the competitive watermelon market is perceived according to a recursive and cyclic timescale, rather than a linear one as discussed by most theories of the Anthropocene.

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David Collins

The following list continues the entries published in the previous issue of Sibirica. It includes items from late 1993 to 1995 and some earlier publications discovered since the list was published. I would be very grateful for information about any items which have escaped my attention, so that they can be included later.

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David Collins

This is a continuation of the lists published in Sibirica vol. 2 nos.1 and 2. It includes items from earlier years (1991–1995) discovered since the publication of my previous lists.

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Amir Khisamutdinov

Beginnings Vladimir Klavdievich Arsen'ev, the most famous Russian explorer of the Far East, said on the eve of his death, “I look to the past and see that for myself I did follow a lucky star.” 1 Through the Bolshevik Revolution and through

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Michael Bradshaw

The spring of 2003 saw a number of key announcements relating to the Sakhalin oil and gas projects. After considerable speculation, the Sakhalin Energy Investment Company announced that it was to go ahead with a $10 billion investment to construct Russia's first liquefied natural gas plant to export gas to Northeast Asia. This article examines the wider context of Russia's potential as an oil and gas supplier to Northeast Asia. It considers the prospects for the numerous gas pipeline projects that are being proposed. It then focuses in detail on the prospects for oil and gas development offshore of Sakhalin. The background to the current projects is presented and the composition and current status of the major projects reviewed. The article then examines the processes that are helping to shape the projects and places Sakhalin with the wider debate of the impact of globalisation upon Russia's economic transformation. The paper concludes by assessing the prospects for the future.