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Ester Levanon-Mordoch

This paper examines the presentation of female characters in dramatic roles, in which they appear as representatives of marginalized Jewish immigrants to Israel (olim hadashim, to use the Hebrew term). The two plays examined here were written as criticisms of Israel's double standards concerning the actual acceptance and assimilation of the 'welcomed and longed-for' immigrants, and have hitherto been examined from this perspective. A reading of these plays from the perspective of feminist critique shows that the representation of the central female characters suffers from a pattern of double stereotypical characterization; these characters are stigmatized and stereotyped both in the category of 'women' and in the category of 'unwelcome immigrants'. Thus, in some cases, counterproductively to the playwright's attempt to criticize Israeli institutions and hegemonic society, these representations reveal the stereotypical tendencies inherent in the playwright's own 'transparent' or 'unconscious' world view when it comes to female representation.

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Sharifah Aishah Osman

.1177/0891243205278639 David , Maya Khemlani , and Yeok Meng Ngeow . 2007 . “ Gender Stereotypes in Malaysian Parliamentarian Debates .” Language. Text. Society 1 ( 2 ): e71 – e89 . https://ltsj.online/2007-01-2-david-ngeow Fernandez , Janet Ann , and Azmawaty

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Apryl Berney

Abstract

Drawing on interviews with Black women who sang in all-female vocal groups during the late 1950s and early 1960s, I examine the important role played by integrated public and private schools in the formation of the 1960s girl group phenomenon. From talent shows to choir practice, locker rooms to hallways, Black girls took up audible space in institutions of higher learning whenever they harmonized with friends or acquaintances. The collective identities Black girls created in their vocal groups allowed them to challenge racial and gender stereotypes in the civil rights era while also modeling sisterhood and friendship for subsequent generations of girls.

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Picturing Politics

Female Political Leaders in France and Norway

Anne Krogstad and Aagoth Storvik

This article explores images of high-level female politicians in France and Norway from 1980 to 2010, examining the ways in which they present themselves to the media and their subsequent reception by journalists. Women in French politics experience difficulties living up to a masculine heroic leadership ideal historically marked by drama, conquest, and seductiveness. In contrast, Norwegian female politicians have challenged the traditional leadership ethos of conspicuous modesty and low-key presentation. We argue that images of French and Norwegian politicians in the media are not only national constructions; they are also gendered. Seven images of women in politics are discussed: (1) men in skirts and ladies of stone, (2) seductresses, (3) different types of mothers, (4) heroines of the past, (5) women in red, (6) glamorous women, and (7) women using ironic femininity. The last three images-color, glamour, and irony-are identified as new strategies female politicians use to accentuate their positions of power with signs of female sensuality. It is thus possible for female politicians to show signs of feminine sensuality and still avoid negative gender stereotyping.

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Making Men out of Boys

Revisiting Connell through Twenty-First-Century Indian Picturebooks

Sridipa Dandapat and Priyanka Tripathi

illustration shows her father's zeal in carrying vegetables and groceries. Another powerful statement that subtly challenges gender stereotypes and gender-specific chores takes place when Aaisha informs readers that her “Abba takes charge of the kitchen” ( Ali

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Roxanne Harde

discourse on rape culture is plagued by gender stereotyping, sexism, misogyny, and rape myths. She discusses two short stories aimed at girl readers that are retellings of Malaysian legends and feminist responses to the normalization and perpetuation of rape

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Janet Burden

constructed borders or who ‘transgress’ them in some way. People who convert challenge categorization, as do those who defy gender stereotypes. I would add to these more obvious examples people who are marginalized in other ways: by illness, economic

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Paula MacDowell

through their media production processes. I believe that if we want to learn more about girls we need to listen to their stories. Additionally, if we want girls to transform gender stereotypes in popular media we need to educate and empower them to create

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Erin Newcomb

, the princess story subgenre exerts influence at the social and personal levels. Rothschild describes “periods of ‘gender intensification,’ stages in life when the person is more aware of and influenced by traditional gender stereotypes” (6); such

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A “Sense of Presence”

The “me of me” in Black Girlhoods

Claudia Mitchell and Ann Smith

institutions of higher learning whenever they harmonized with friends or acquaintances” the “collective identities Black girls created in their vocal groups allowed them to challenge racial and gender stereotypes.” The issue wraps up with the creative piece