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Gender, Curiosity, and the Grand Tour

Late-Eighteenth-Century British Travel Writing

Anna P.H. Geurts

as grand tours. This forms part of a wider trend to call every eighteenth-century cross-border journey in Europe a grand tour. I would like to follow Katherine Turner in her skepsis of the insistence by historians like Brian Dolan, Chloe Chard, and

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Joshua Nash

Architectural pilgrimage is implicitly appreciated in architecture and design circles, especially by students who are encouraged to “travel to architecture,” with the focus on the Grand Tour as a means of architectural exploration. However, the expression has not been made explicit in the fields of architectural history, pilgrimage studies, tourism research, and mobility studies. I explore how pilgrimage to locations of modern architectural interest affects and informs pilgrims' and architects' conceptions of buildings and the pilgrimage journey itself. Drawing initially on a European architectural pilgrimage, the personal narrative highlights the importance of self-reflection and introspection when observing the built environment and the role of language in mediating processes of movement through and creation of architectural place-space.

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Miriam L. Wallace

Best known as political radicals and novelists, Mary Wollstonecraft and Thomas Holcroft each wrote a travel narrative: Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark ([1796] 1987) and Travels from Hamburg through Westphalia, Holland and the Netherlands to Paris (1804), respectively. Despite their specific differences, both Wollstonecraft and Holcroft reconfigure travel as a politically inflected act of cultural encounter, resisting both the Grand Tour tradition of elite education and Romantic travel as an asocial and personal experience of the sublime. Although Wollstonecraft's account has been examined as a kind of feminine sublime or roman à clef, her political project has frequently been elided, seen as separate from the personal affect of her account. Holcroft's narrative is simply neglected. Reading these two travel accounts as products of late eighteenth-century British radical reform and developing Romantic sensibility enhances our understanding of eighteenth-century travel narrative and British Romanticism itself.

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Stacy Burton, Travel Narrative and the Ends of Modernity Reviewed by Nicklas Hållén

Chloe Chard, A Critical Reader of the Romantic Grand Tour: Tristes Plaisirs Reviewed by David G. Farley

Hazel Andrews and Les Roberts, Liminal Landscapes: Travel, Experiences and Spaces In-between Reviewed by Eduardo Chemin

Sharon Ouditt, Impressions of Southern Italy: British Travel Writing from Henry Winburne to Norman Douglas Reviewed by Nathalie Hester

David Picard and Mike Robinson, eds., Emotion in Motion: Tourism, Affect and Transformation Reviewed by Hazel Tucker

Noel Salazar, Envisioning Eden: Mobilising Imaginaries in Tourism and Beyond Reviewed by Jonathan Skinner

Anna Fedele, Looking for Mary Magdalene: Alternative Pilgrimages and Ritual Creativity at Catholic Shrines in France Reviewed by Ellen Badone

Antón M. Pazos, ed., Pilgrims and Politics: Rediscovering the Power of the Pilgrimage Reviewed by Mariano Barbato

Denys Pringle, Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and the Holy Land, 1187–1291 Reviewed by Guy Galazka

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EXHIBITION HELOISA NOVAES (2 March–21 April, 2000), Maison de l’Amérique Latine, 217 Bd Saint-Germain, Paris VII°. Maria Pia Di Bella

Paul Baepler (ed.) White Slaves, African Masters: An Anthology of American Captivity Narratives Robert, C. Davis

Chloe Chard, Pleasure and Guilt on the Grand Tour: Travel Writing and Imaginative Geography, 1600–1830 Kay Dian Kriz

Wilkie Collins, Iolani, or, Tahiti as it was Rod Edmond

Dinora Corsi (ed.), Altrove. Viaggi di donne dall’antichità al Novecento Maria Luisa Silvestre and Adriana Valerio (eds), Donne in viaggio. Viaggio religioso, politico, metaforico Andreina De Clementi and Maria Stella (eds), Viaggi di donne Luisa Passerini

William Dalrymple The Age of Kali: Indian Travels and Encounters Stacey Burlet

Ja´s Elsner and Joan-Pau Rubiés (eds), Voyages and Visions: Towards a Cultural History of Travel Roger Cardinal

G. Malcolm Lewis (ed.), Cartographic Encounters: Perspectives on Native American Mapping and Map Use Lorenz Hurni

Jean Mohr and John Berger, At the Edge of the World Alison M. Phipps

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At the Root of Learned Travel

New Science, the ‘Other’ and Imperialism in the Early Philosophical Transactions

Manuela D’Amore

: the Grand Tour of the Old Continent. Notes 1 On the foundation and evolutionary phases of the Journal des sçavans , see William E. Burns, The Scientific Revolution: An Encyclopedia (Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO, 2001), 156. 2 Detailed information on

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“We Are a Traveling People”

Tourism, Travel Journalism, and the Construction of a Modern National Identity in Sweden

Emilia Ljungberg

classical education. This kind of traveling can be likened to the grand tours that the young aristocrats of the eighteenth century took in the company of an older man who acted as a teacher ( Baranowski and Furlough 2001 ). To visit the places of classical

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In Fortune Fair and Foul

Happiness and Care of the Self in Sir Kenelm Digby's Letter-Book In Praise of Venetia

Paula Barros

. 2. Heaven on earth: the idealisation of conjugal love Before he married, Digby embarked on a Grand Tour which took him to France, Italy and Spain. He spent two years in Florence, where, in Michael Foster's words, ‘he became fluent in Italian’ and

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Amélie Auzoux

européens de Barnabooth sont autant d’observations directes de son “grand tour” d’Europe, autant de “coups de sonde dans le grand corps de la réalité des voyageurs.” 11 Les nouvelles que Larbaud publie dans l’après-guerre, Beauté, mon beau souci … ou Mon

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The Continent Behind

Alienation and the American Scene in George William Curtis’s Lotus-Eating: A Summer Book

James Weaver

1850s as a correspondent for the New York Tribune and then an editor first with Putnam’s Monthly and later with Harper’s Monthly . That career ascent began after Curtis returned from a four-year grand tour that took him through much of Europe, to