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Robert Zaretsky

Algeria is never far from the center of Albert Camus's life and work—no further, in effect, than Ithaka is from the center of Odysseus's thoughts. In fact, Camus tended to see his native country through his readings of ancient Greek myth and tragedy. This article traces the ways in which Camus, with materials provided by ancient Greece, not only represented his native land, but also elaborated a “Mediterranean” school of thought—la pensée du Midi—that emphasizes the role of moderation or “measure.” There is an undeniable aspect of nostalgia to Camus's rendering of his country and its past, but this does not undermine its validity. By making use of Svetlana Boym's fruitful distinction between reflective and restorative forms of nostalgia, I suggest that the combination of the two categories lies at the heart of Camus's “philosophy of limits.”

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The Exquisite Corpse of Ganymede

A Cursory Overview of an Ancient Gender Studies Discourse

Andrew Calimach

This essay examines surviving traces of the Zeus and Ganymede myth and identifies two interwoven discourses on male love in antiquity: one, a tradition integral to a Cretan initiatory rite and its didactic nature evidenced by an analogous and opposite Boeotian cautionary myth; the other, a nucleus of polemic and shifting male love constructions from Minoan times through Late Antiquity. The mythic tradition is discussed as an archetypal key to identifying the ancient pedagogical and erotic functions of male love and the ancients’ evolving attitudes toward such relationships. As the myth and its offshoots, which are presented here in the form of a pastiche evocative of the atmosphere of the tradition, reflect their Classical and modern echoes through Western and Oriental interpretations, a recurring male love ethic and aesthetic is seen to take shape.

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The Crown and the Crowd

Sublimations of Monarchy in Georgian Satirical Prints

David Morgan

compositional conventions of high baroque art, coupled in turn with a knowledge of relevant classical Greek mythology. One can imagine, perhaps, that the politically attuned, wealthy urban sophisticates who would have patronised Hannah Humphreys’s shop in St

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“One Is Not Born a Dramatist”

The Genesis of Sartre’s Theatrical Career in Writings to, with, and by Beauvoir

Dennis A. Gilbert

on two related themes: violence—“I wanted a city under siege, pograms, who knows what else. … So I returned to my plan of writing a large-scale play with blood, rape, and massacres” 39 —and, again, Greek mythology—“All day long I’ve been daydreaming