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Menno W. Straatsma and Reinier J.W. de Nooij

Integrated river management is heralded as the new style of river management, but it has been preceded by a number of previous styles, and is unlikely to be the last. This article presents the first analysis of the evolution of river management using Spiral Dynamics (SD). SD provides a growth hierarchy of value systems (vMemes), reflecting increasing complexity and inclusiveness ranging from instinctive to holistic. Based on an interpretation of literature and policy documents, we conclude that (1) SD provides a broad interpretative framework that can be applied in all river basins, (2) river management in the Netherlands shows the subsequent dominance of the blue, orange, and green vMeme, yellow is at the take-off phase, (3) further transition to yellow integrated river management requires identification of barriers to change. We give an overview and policy implications. Further research should be oriented towards quantification of vMemes in stakeholders and landscaping measures.

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Afterword

Reversing the world—What austerity does to time and place

Theodoros Rakopoulos

Instead of taking for granted that austerity is unidirectionally associated with Europe, the anthropology of austerity should be paying attention to the situatedness of its effects. The levering potential that a comparative analysis of austerity allows is precious, for it opens new critical perspectives on our understanding of temporal and geographical consciousness. An antipode of perspective invites a more historical analysis of a phenomenon that unsettles the conceived understandings of Europe’s position.

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'Everything is still before you'

The irony of youth discourse in Siberia

David G. Anderson

Russians often use slogans to triangulate themselves between state and society, and slogans about youth are no exception. This article conducts a cultural historical analysis of how the concept of 'youth' has been applied both to young people and to the idea of a nation in Siberia. The author argues that categories of youth in Russia, and in Siberia, are very different from their Euro-American cousins. Citing survey data, and material from historical and contemporary movements for self-determination, he argues that youth discourse is future-oriented, collectivist, and is often used in an ironic register in order to carry moral messages.

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Olga Rybakova

The article is a review of social dynamics of the evangelist communities in the Magadan oblast. Through historical analysis of events the article studies development process of religious communities from the time of their establishment to contemporary situation. At present all communities of the Protestant Church in Russia try to find their place in secular society that aligns itself with the Orthodox Church. The religious communities in the Magadan region have a historic task to formulate their vision and identify purpose of their religious service in this region.

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José Eisenberg

The author provides a historical analysis of the use of gender metaphors in republican discourse, chiefly the representation of the republic as a father (patria) and as a mother (matria). Both metaphors are present throughout the history of Western political thought, from ancient Rome to the Modern Era. The text shows that their use has profound implications in the way citizenship is conceived and loyalty to the republic can be justified. Finally, the text also identifies a third republican metaphor, fraternity, which has been mostly neglected by republican thought, with few important exceptions. The author concludes by exploring the normative and theoretical possibilities opened up by substituting fraternity for the gendered metaphors.

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A Time without Soldiers

Writing about Kashmir Today

Suvir Kaul

In this article I ask what it means to turn to scholarly analysis to understand better the historical lineages of an urgent contemporary political situation. I first wrote on Kashmir in a journalistic fashion because I was appalled by the militarization and routine suspension of civil rights that I saw when I went there in 2003. Since then I have been thinking of analytical frames in which to provide a longer history for the political mess I observed and continue to observe, which leads me to read in the “field“ in order to understand issues as they developed before 1989—when militancy in Kashmir broke out. What limits on my understanding are put in place by my early writing, which was motivated by sorrow and anger, rather than by the criteria that we expect motivates historical analysis? What kinds of insight are enabled by that same beginning?

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The Ill-Equipped Modernist

Historicizing Édouard Dujardin’s Les Lauriers Sont Coupés

Kelly J. Maynard

This article undertakes a historical analysis of Édouard Dujardin’s 1887 novel Les Lauriers sont coupés, best known for its infl uence on James Joyce’s Ulysses. Les Lauriers has been interpreted by literary scholars as a piece of experimental prose symptomatic of several intersecting aesthetic trends of the French fin de siècle, most notably symbolism, Wagnerism, and modernism. However, I approach the novel through a microhistorical lens, using Dujardin’s letters, contemporary press materials, and maps of post-Haussmann Paris to focus on the author’s biography as well as the political, cultural, and social contexts of the mid-1880s. From this perspective Les Lauriers serves as an insightful barometer of the experiential complexities of a city and a society in the throes of transitioning to modernity. Working at the intersection of literary analysis and cultural history, this article provides compelling evidence of the mutually revelatory ties that bind a work of art and its context.

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'Den Geist des Judentums Erkennbar Machen . . .'

Objectives and Results of Philosophical Enquiry within Wissenschaft des Judentums

Esther Seidel

The philosophical understanding of Wissenschaft continued to have an impact well beyond Hegel, even though the way Wissenschaft continued to see itself became more and more influenced by those disciplines which were then trying to establish themselves as Einzelwissenschaften and as independent of philosophy. Still, the attempt to constitute philosophy as fundamental to Wissenschaft was a trend of the early nineteenth century, because philosophy was uniquely qualified to provide methodological explanations and to decide, by speculative design or by experiment, what Wissenschaft could be and should be. Wissenschaft, on the basis of philosophy, could clarify the object of research, its domains and overall relevance, assess the method to be used and the objectives to be attained; it could provide the appropriate terminology, as well as a historical analysis and it would present the unifying view and integration against the dangers of too much specialisation.

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Julia Neuberger

My first few visits to the Leo Baeck College from Cambridge in 1972 were amazing to me because of a totally different, far less dry, approach to texts. I was blessed, then and later, with classes taught by Nelly Littman and Rabbi Dr Louis Jacobs. After three years at Cambridge (this was my fourth year, and I made weekly visits to the College), I was used to people standing and lecturing me even if I was the only person in the class. I was used to discussions of cognate languages, of a form of historical analysis that has stayed with me for the rest of my life but left little room for an emotional bond with a period or a people, and of a deep and loving understanding of the Hebrew language.

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Black October

Comics, Memory, and Cultural Representations of 17 October 1961

Claire Gorrara

The brutal police repression of the demonstration of 17 October 1961 stands as a stark reminder of the violence of French colonialism. A continuing official reluctance to acknowledge these traumatic events has led individuals and groups to seek alternative routes for recognition. This article explores one of these alternative routes: the comic book, and specifically Octobre Noir, a collaboration between writer Didier Daeninckx and graphic artist Mako. By analyzing the reframing of 17 October 1961 within the comic form, this article argues that Octobre noir offers a site for interrogating the relationship between history and memory. This is achieved by exchanging a cultural narrative of police brutality and Algerian victimization for a narrative of legitimate protest and Algerian political agency. Octobre noir exemplifies the value of the comic book as a vector of memory able to represent the past in ways that enrich historical analysis and inter disciplinary debate.