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Shiran Avni

According to Hanna Scolnicov, ‘Biblical Hebrew is not a neutral language, that easily encompasses new ideas. It holds within itself a whole universe of associations, beliefs, stories, and prayers, that become the language’s intertext. Every word and

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Hebrew Literature in the ‘World Republic of Letters’

Translation and Reception, 1918–2018

Yael Halevi-Wise and Madeleine Gottesman

Having recently dusted itself off from a religious domain, Hebrew literature today must rely on translation and international dissemination to reach beyond its five million native speakers. Although Hebrew certainly falls into the category of lesser

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Gideon Kouts

Hebrew culture, including the press and theatre criticism, has always maintained a tangled and delicate relationship with Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice , for understandable reasons. This article investigates the first criticism of this play

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Eran Shuali

. 3 Since shortly after his conversion and until his sudden death in 1883, 4 Salkinson published Hebrew translations of the following books: Paul’s Epistle to the Romans (1855); 5 Philosophy of the Plan of Salvation by an American Citizen (1858

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Hebrew Dystopias

From National Catastrophes to Ecological Disasters

Netta Bar Yosef-Paz

In the past decade, a new wave of Hebrew dystopic novels has appeared, ranging from complex and elevated literary pieces like Imagine a Mountain ( Bet Levi 2014 ) and 2023 (Sarna 2014) to the simplistic and naive The Sea Above Us ( Rubinstein

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The Word of the Lord to Shylock

Biblical Forms in the Translations of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice to Hebrew

Atar Hadari

runs alongside the text itself, a tradition of interpretation which I will argue has been imported into the Hebrew translations and guided translation choices in the text. I will focus on the translation of just two words in the most famous speech in

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A Hebrew Take on Shylock on the New York Stage

Shylock ‘47 at the Pargod Theatre (1947)

Edna Nahshon

Shylock’47 , a production of the Pargod Theatre 1 , opened on 27 May 1947 in New York City at the Juilliard School of Music, with subsequent performances at the Masters Institute. Staged entirely in Hebrew, it was a bold and pioneering enterprise

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Amotz Giladi

Israeli poet Yonatan Ratosh was the leader of the Young Hebrews, a nationalist group active from the 1940s to the 1970s. Despite his opposition to Zionism and his aspiration to revive the ancient Hebrews’ premonotheistic civilization, Ratosh shared Zionism’s ambition to elaborate a new Israeli identity. One prominent act of this mission involved enlarging the literary corpus in Hebrew through translation. Although initially a means of income, for Ratosh translation increasingly came to be a way to express his ideological position and his self-image as an intellectual. Thus, Ratosh provides an example of how developing a national identity can coincide with appropriating foreign literature. With his regular exhortations that Hebrew readers attain knowledge of foreign cultures, Ratosh did not intend to promote cosmopolitanism. Rather, he considered these endeavors as ultimately reinforcing a “Hebrew” identity.

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Of Other Cinematic Spaces

Urban Zionism in Early Hebrew Cinema

Hizky Shoham

The Zionist ethos is commonly described as pro-rural and anti-urban, with the imagined Zionist space perceived as being rural and the Zionist drama as a reflection of the life of the pioneers in Palestine. Recent studies of early Hebrew cinema shared this view. This article analyzes two Jewish films from inter-war Palestine, Vayehi Bimey (In the Days of Yore) (1932, Tel Aviv) and Zot Hi Ha'aretz (This Is the Land) (1935, Tel Aviv), to suggest a more complex view of the Zionist ethos and spatial imagery in the context of the relationship between the urban and the rural. A thematic and formal analysis of the films shows their sources of Soviet influence and reveals the presentation of the city as a nationalist space.

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Adriana X. Jacobs

languages) complicate and enrich this relation? This article opens with a consideration of the rich legacy of Hebrew translations of Shakespeare’s Sonnets , highlighting how Hebrew translation practices have aligned closely with developments in the