Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 124 items for :

  • "Heidegger" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Graham Smith and Gertrud Heidegger

Democratic Innovations: Designing Institutions for Citizen Participation, by Graham Smith Jeffery Hilmer

Martin Heidegger – Letters to His Wife: 1915-1970, edited by Gertrud Heidegger Kai Horsthemke

Restricted access

Paul Gyllenhammer

geological debate. Nor do I intend to detail the science of climate change or planetary Earth system transformations. What I aim to do in this article is bring the great existentialists—Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sartre—into this issue. 2 I do so because

Restricted access

Christopher Howard and Wendelin Küpers

“I am never here only, as this encapsulated body; rather, I am there, that is, I already pervade [the world] and only thus can go I through it.” — Heidegger, “Building, Dwelling, Thinking” 1 “My body is wherever it has something to

Restricted access

Opposing Political Philosophy and Literature

Strauss's Critique of Heidegger and the Fate of the 'Quarrel between Philosophy and Poetry'

Paul O'mahoney

Strauss's critique of Heidegger's philosophy aims at a recovery of political philosophy, which he saw as threatened by Heidegger's radical historicism; for Strauss, philosophy as a whole could not survive without political philosophy, and his return to the classical tradition of political philosophy, while inspired by the work of Heidegger, was directed against what he saw as the nihilism that was its consequence. Here I wish to examine a dimension of Strauss's critique which, though hinted at, remains neglected or unexplored by Strauss: that is, how the critique of Heideggarian historicism should naturally link with Strauss's frequent attention to the issue of the ancient 'quarrel between philosophy and poetry'. It has often been observed by other commentators that through Heidegger's work, philosophy appears liable to be supplanted by contemporary literature, whether poetry or philosophy. As some of Strauss's explicit statements extend his definition of what falls under the category of 'poetry' in the modern age to contemporary novels and poetry, this aspect of Heidegger should have commanded more of his attention. Endurance of the quarrel between philosophy and poetry becomes through the prism of Strauss's work the confrontation of political philosophy with literature, particularly the novel form. It was not so much the rise of modern, non-teleological natural science that threatened the endurance and dignity of philosophy, then, but the rise of modern literature; the critique of historicism, when viewed in the light of the enduring 'quarrel', should lead one to a consideration of a crucial issue which remained oddly neglected, or was only hinted at, by Strauss.

Restricted access

Peter Eli Gordon

Julian Young, Heidegger, philosophy, Nazism (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1997)

Herman Philipse, Heidegger’s Philosophy of Being: A Critical Interpretation. (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1998)

Michael Friedman, A Parting of the Ways: Carnap, Cassirer, and Heidegger (Chicago: Open Court, 2000)

Restricted access

Marie-Eve Morin

This paper compares Sartre's and Nancy's experience of the plurality of beings. After briefly discussing why Heidegger cannot provide such an experience, it analyzes the relation between the in-itself and for-itself in Sartre and between bodies and sense in Nancy in order to ask how this experience can be nauseating for Sartre, but meaningful for Nancy. First, it shows that the articulation of Being into beings is only a coat of veneer for Sartre while for Nancy Being is necessarily plural. Then, it contrasts Nausea as an experience without language with Nancy's thinking of the excription of sense in the thing.

Restricted access

Fatima Zahra Bessedik

task, my analysis will be anchored in Martin Heidegger’s conception of homelessness in his existential discourse on ‘being’ (or ‘Dasein’) . Heidegger’s philosophy of existential phenomenology and his focus on the issue of ‘being’ provide a keen insight

Restricted access

Janson M. Costanzo

Heidegger’s Philosophy of Being: A Critical Interpretation, by Herman Philipse Jason M. Costanzo

Full access

Adrian van den Hoven

-reference these quotes, one is sometimes obliged to scour several texts before one discovers what he really had in mind. This is often the case when he decides to borrow expressions from other philosophers such as Heidegger. Richmond encountered this problem and

Restricted access

Adam Sitze

The thesis I consider in this essay takes the form of a chiasmus. Just as Heidegger’s Nazism requires us to re-evaluate his 1943 interpretation of Nietzsche as an instance of what Michel Foucault, in a 1978 interview, called a “regime of truth” (Foucault 1980: 133), so too does Foucault’s 1983 claim that a Heideggerian reading of Nietzsche determined his philosophical development (Foucault 1996: 430) call for us to inquire into the “unthought” of Foucault’s philosophical project. To re-read Heidegger by way of Foucault, I submit, is also to re-read Foucault by way of Heidegger. At stake in this thesis is how to understand Foucault’s concept of “power”. Or, more to the point, at stake is how to understand the twist with which Foucault closes that same 1978 interview: “The political question, to sum up, is not error, illusion, alienated consciousness or ideology; it is truth itself. Hence the importance of Nietzsche” (Foucault 1980: 133).