Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 56 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

Your Past Comes Back to Haunt You

Sartre on Pure Reflection in Response to Husserl & Levinas

Curtis Sommerlatte

In a famous account of Sartre's introduction to phenomenology, Beauvoir reports that Sartre subsequently purchased and eagerly read Emmanuel Levinas's The Theory of Intuition in Husserl's Phenomenology . 1 Despite its importance in Sartre

Restricted access

From Perception to Action

Sartre's Practical Phenomenology

Blake D. Scott

Over the course of his “holiday in Berlin” from the fall of 1933 to the summer of 1934, Jean-Paul Sartre encountered the writings of Edmund Husserl, which would prove to be a major point of reference for his thought in the coming decades. 1

Restricted access

Beata Stawarska

When remembering the past, the past appears as my own. After all, I cannot properly speaking recollect any other past than the one that I have lived, even though I can remember events from the historical past and from personal histories recounted to me by others. Authentic recollection occurs necessarily in the first person, i.e. I remember myself in given situations, circumstances and places. Recollection is therefore a cogito experience par excellence, despite the fact that I may have become estranged from my past engagements, emotional attachments or culinary preferences. The difference between myself in the past and myself in the present does not put the underlying identity of one life into question. Memory affirms my personal identity, despite the temporal difference and in that difference, it appears therefore as a privileged context for inquiry into subjective life and possibly even as the ground for upholding the contested notion of “the subject.”1 No wonder then that the way philosophers theorize memory is indicative of their conception of subjectivity as a whole. In what follows, I turn to Sartre and to Husserl with the aim of unveiling how their accounts of recollection resolve the question of identity and difference within the temporality of a subjective life. Tracing Sartre’s arguments against Husserl’s, as well as Husserl’s and Sartre’s own presentations of recollection, I inquire into the reasons that incited them to bring either the aspect of sameness or otherness at the heart of subjective life into view.

Restricted access

The Punctum and the Past

Sartre and Barthes on Memory and Fascination

Patrick Eldridge

follows Husserl’s claim that in order to remember an object, one must also be conscious of the original act related to it. If I remember the childhood event of burying my pet betta fish in the backyard, I explicitly intend the limp blue and red fish, the

Restricted access

Andrew Inkpin

phenomenologist, and in particular that he took phenomenology seriously as a philosophical method. I therefore proceed in two main stages. In the first section I discuss the relation between Husserl’s and Sartre’s respective conceptions of phenomenology to

Restricted access

Derek K. Heyman, Beata Stawarska, Thomas R. Flynn, and David Detmer

Steven Laycock, Nothingness and Emptiness: A Buddhist Engagement with the Ontology of Jean-Paul Sartre. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001), 240pp. ISBN 0791449106, $21.95 (paper). Review by Derek K. Heyman

Stephen Priest, The Subject in Question: Sartre’s Critique of Husserl in the Transcendence of the Ego. New York: Routledge, 2000, 192 pp. ISBN 041521369X, $105. Review by Beata Stawarska

Ronald Aronson, Camus and Sartre: The Story of Friendship and the Quarrel that Ended It. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004, 248 pp. ISBN 0226027691, $32.50. Review by Thomas R. Flynn

Ronald E. Santoni, Sartre on Violence: Curiously Ambivalent. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2003, 179pp. ISBN 0-271-02300-7, $35.00. Review by David Detmer

Restricted access

Bruce Baugh

The fiftieth anniversary issue of Les Temps modernes leads off with an article by Jacques Derrida, “‘Il courait mort’: Salut, salut. Notes pour un courrier aux Temps modernes,” a tribute both to Les Temps modernes and to its founder, Jean-Paul Sartre. For those who have followed what Derrida has said over the years, this “tribute” came as something of a surprise. Derrida, after all, had mocked Sartre as the “onto-phenomenologist of freedom,” always in search of a “fundamental project” that could explain an individual’s whole life; he called “daring” or “risky” Sartre’s criticism of Bataille for having a shaky understanding of German philosophical terms and concepts when Sartre himself had, in Derrida’s view, a very inadequate grasp of Hegel, Husserl and Heidegger.

Free access

John Ireland and Constance Mui

disposition toward bad faith. Returning to Sartre's famous revision of intentionality, separating him from Husserl, Blake Scott draws an important distinction between Husserl's “theoretical intentionality”, which operates at the level of perception, and

Restricted access

Sartrean Self-Consciousness and the Principle of Identity

Sartre’s Implicit Argument for the Non-Self-Identity of the Subject

Maiya Jordan

and questions about the self-identity of consciousness are closely related. Edmund Husserl advances a paradigmatic iterative theory of pre-reflection. 5 He distinguishes experiences ( Erlebnisse ) from the experiencing ( Erleben ) of those

Restricted access

L'Image entre le corps et l'esprit

Le Mémoire de fin d'études de Sartre

Vincent de Coorebyter

, il serait tentant de consacrer cette contribution à une comparaison entre les deux œuvres, qui permettrait de mesurer l'apport de Husserl dans la phénoménologie sartrienne de l'imaginaire. Mais un tel exercice serait d'une redoutable complexité