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“Migrant” Writing and the Re-Imagined Community: Discourses of Inclusion/Exclusion

Máiréad Nic Craith

This article examines changing discourses of exclusion/inclusion between writers of a non-German background and those whose families have traditionally lived in Germany. Referring to the Adelbert von Chamisso Prize, it critiques discourses of difference used in recent decades to describe “migrant” writers in Germany and evaluates some reactions to their writings by the German reading public. With reference to the concept of print-capitalism, the article explores the “new semantic vistas” opened up by migrant writers and the implications of their writing styles for both linguistic and national boundaries. Drawing on original ethnographic interviews with migrant authors, it queries the relevance of binary logic at the beginning of the twenty-first century and argues for greater recognition of the contribution of these writers to the literary landscape in Germany and beyond.

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Inclusion without recognition

The socialist Left and immigrants in 1970s Italy

Davide Però

Diverting from the prevailing trend that considers Italy in terms of international migrations, this article examines one aspect of its internal mass migrations, namely, how the mainstream Left of the 1960s and 1970s constructed southern immigrants in northern cities, taking the 'red city' of Bologna as a privileged context for analysis. The article argues that this construction—despite a number of significant limitations—was on the whole inclusionary, as it incorporated the immigrants into the working class and into the socialist project of societal transformation. By analytically describing the framing of immigrants by the 'socialist' Left, this article also highlights the historically specific nature in which migrants are constructed, lays the basis for a future comparison with the contemporary 'postsocialist' construction of immigrants, and provides material for a more general anthropological reflection on the trajectories followed by discourses of inclusion/exclusion in recent decades.

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Some Preliminary Considerations about Social Cohesion and Social Quality

Laurent J.G. van der Maesen

The recently published report by Wolfgang Beck exploring the role of social cohesion in European policies (Beck, 2001) is of interest for the European Foundation on Social Quality. Indeed, in the Foundation second book, ‘Social Quality: A Vision for Europe’, the analysis of social cohesion is seen as a priority in the strengthening of the theoretical basis of social quality (Beck et al., 2001). The editors of this last book emphasise the fact that defining the substance of social cohesion is a delicate matter. Because of its long scientific and political history the concept has been, up to now, connected with a wide range of other concepts with related connotations, such as inclusion, exclusion, integration, disintegration, and social dissolution. Contrary to many studies on social cohesion, the way they approach social cohesion as one of the four components of social quality is not restricted to the strength or weakness of primary social relationships (Lockwood, 1999). It is connected with processes of differentiation, which create a manifold of subsystems that cannot be directly linked as such with the logic of social structures such as families, households and associations. As a result the individual subject is forced to react in a multi-inclusive way. This is becoming now even more complex since, because of the explosive development of communication technologies, the pace and place of social relationships are changing. (Beck et al., 2001: 343) In this contribution we will present some elements of Beck’s report and we shall connect these with herewith-related parts of the Foundation’s second book.

Open access

Book Review

Larisa Carranza

to retain legal status, reunite with family members and pursue citizenship (p. 4). Tuckett uses extensive ethnographic and textual references to support her analysis of Italian law that perpetuates notions of inclusion/exclusion and il/legality. The

Open access

Public Health in Eastern Europe

Visible Modernization and Elusive Gender Transformation

Evguenia Davidova

“peasant medical culture” (245). The process of professional inclusion/exclusion was carried out through examinations and licenses, and gradually empirics were marginalized. Examining nineteenth-century Romania's state and nation building through the eyes

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Problematising Boundaries and ‘Hierarchies of Knowledge’ within European Anthropologies

Alessandro Testa

boundaries are inevitable. Their effects can be discussed of course, mitigated maybe, but yet are inevitable. In my view, no fruitful discussion can happen without accepting the inevitability and universality of inclusion/exclusion patterns in all spheres of

Open access

The Curious Case of Slovakia

Regime Preferences Thirty Years after the Velvet Revolution

Zuzana Reptova Novakova

( Plichtová and Šestaková 2019 ; cf. Bútorová and Gyárfášová 2010 ). Social Inclusion Identity is another contributing factor of cohesion, and it has an impact on some of the dynamics of social inclusion/exclusion, as it is shaped by the

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How Motion Shapes Thought in Cinema

The Embodied Film Style of Éric Rohmer

Maarten Coëgnarts

deprived of rhetorical techniques such as close-ups and exuberant camera movements, is significantly grounded in dynamic patterns of containment either elicited by mobile framing ( inclusion, exclusion ) or by fixed-frame movement ( entry, exit ). These

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Home Away from Home

Ethnography of an EU Erasmus+ Project

Terry Lamb and Danila Mayer

field of refugee support in European countries. Together they contributed to a substantial discourse concerning their experiences of engagement, inclusion/exclusion and the (im)possible demarcations between overlapping and multiple occupations and

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Mobility and Infrastructure in the Russian Arctic

Das Sein bestimmt das Bewusstsein?

Nikolai Vakhtin

they do not belong to the same network. … The inclusion/exclusion in networks, and the architecture of relationships between networks … configurate dominant processes and functions in our societies. ( Castells 1996: 470 ) Similarly, the relations