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Paradoxes of transnational space and local activism

Iranians organizing across borders

Halleh Ghorashi and Nayereh Tavakoli

The Iranian revolution of 1979 promised to bring freedom and equality, but as soon as one group gained power, it turned out to be oppressive of both its political opposition and women. This resulted in the formation of a large Iranian diaspora bound together by its hatred for the Iranian regime. Years of suppression in the 1980s in Iran resulted in a deep gap between Iranians living inside and outside Iran. During the 1990s, however, cross-border relationships started to change as a result of two major factors: transnational activities and the influence of cyberspace. This paper focuses on the paradoxes of transnational connections in local protest with a focus on the women’s movement. We show both how transnational links have empowered women activists in Iran and how they have led to new dangers at the local level. We also reveal how support from the Iranian diaspora can be patronizing as well as supportive.

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Reports

Publications, Films and Conferences

Jennie Doberne, Danila Mayer, Soheila Shahshahani, and Jocelyn DeJong

PUBLICATIONS

Stein, Rebecca L. (2008), Itineraries in Conflict: Israelis, Palestinians, and the Political Lives of Tourism (Durham, NC: Duke University Press). ix + 219 pp., notes, bibliography, index.

FILMS

Iranian Travelogues: Notes on Farhad Varahram, Iranian-Austrian Documentary Filmmaker

CONFERENCES

‘Thirty Years On: The Social and Cultural Impacts of the Iranian Revolution’, University of London, School of Oriental and Asian Studies (SOAS), 5–6 June 2009

Reproductive Health Working Group Annual Meeting, Istanbul, July 2008

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Methods Applied

Political Transformation and Recent Ethnographic Fieldwork in Iran

Mary Elaine Hegland and Erika Friedl

In the 1970s social cultural anthropology in Iran was beginning to flourish. However, with the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and the subsequent Islamic Republic of Iran, fieldwork in Iran became extremely problematic. Foreign anthropologists faced formidable obstacles to obtaining visas and permits. Anthropologists working inside Iran were also discouraged from anthropological participant observation. As a result, during the post revolutionary period, few anthropologists have been conducting fieldwork in Iran. Recently, some hopeful signs for a possible reestablishment of anthropology can be noted, among them the return of young Iranian anthropologists, from countries where they have grown up and gained an education, to their homeland for dissertation research. This article discusses the influences on fieldwork of politics—international, national and local—and projects, problems and strategies of some anthropologists who have conducted recent ethnographic fieldwork in Iran.

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Entanglements with the 'Sea'

Persian Poetry and Diasporic Iranian Literature in Australia

Nasim Yazdani and Michele Lobo

Displacement following the Iranian Revolution in 1979, and later political instability in the Middle East, has led to the increase of Iranian migrants to Australia and beyond, many of whom live in exile and can never return. This article explores how Iranian conceptualisations of the sea provide a framework for entanglements with nature and the environment that are poetic and turbulent, and provides insights into nostalgia and belonging. It explores some entanglements with the ‘sea’ in the work of classical and contemporary Persian poets, diasporic Iranian women’s literature, artwork and memories of newcomers of Iranian heritage who seek asylum in Australia. The article also highlights the connections between poet and world through investigating the role of the geographical realm and nostalgia in producing the worlds of human relations and thoughts with the place.

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Marcelo Hoffman

’s attention. Over half a decade later, it was the apparent aversion of the movement of Iranian people to the party form through the leadership of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini that partially intrigued Foucault about the Iranian revolution. He wrote: ‘Ayatollah

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Interfaith Families

A Muslim Perspective – Part II

Halima Krausen

organised and able to express themselves and, after the opening of the Iron Curtain, the Jewish communities started growing. The Iranian revolution and 9/11 also contributed a lot to making religion a public topic again. There were critical voices but mainly

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Nadia Malinovich

sentimental feeling.” Nonetheless, Pournazarian, like Kermanshahchi, never considered immigrating to France after the Iranian Revolution. She already had two children in college in the United States at the time, so that country was the natural choice. Sassoon

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Sanaz Nasirpour

Iranian journalists, feminists and activists. They either left Iran during the 1979 Iranian Revolution and were associated with the monarchy as members of the government, or left the country after the Revolution and as a result of political pressure

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Modern Revolutions and Beyond

An Interview with John Dunn

Benjamin Abrams and John Dunn

the Iranian Revolution, two remaining episodes are the process of collapse (and in some cases recollapse) of the Soviet Union and the states left behind from it. You can think of those as just regime collapse: there were many regime collapses before

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Manijeh Nasrabadi, Maryam Aras, Alexander Djumaev, Sina Zekavat, Mary Elaine Hegland, Rosa Holman, and Amina Tawasil

-year-old heroine Tarlan, who has lived through the Iranian Revolution of 1979 and envisions a bright and free future for herself. She is eager to become a writer. The difficult economic situation after the revolution, however, forces Tarlan to enlist as a police