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Menachem Klein

earlier, in 1925, Halbwachs had published his book The Social Framework of Memory . This book, argues the historian Vincent Lemire, made Halbwachs the “first scholar to have attempted a sociological approach to memory processes” (ibid.). In Jerusalem

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Guiding Settler Jerusalem

Voice and the Transpositions of History in Religious Zionist Pilgrimage

Alejandro I. Paz

This article examines how Elad, a religious Zionist settler group, attempts to reanimate biblical tales by transposing biblical text as part of tours for Jewish visitors to the City of David archaeological site in East Jerusalem. Since the early 1990s, Elad has created controversy by settling in the Palestinian neighborhood of Silwan, provoking criticism from Israeli archaeologists and peace activists. In an effort to avoid 'politics' during tours, the group emphasizes a now globalized historicist reading of the Bible, an interpretation popularized by archaeology over the last century and a half. The article considers how transposition from this historicist reading into the here and now is a rhetorical device used to create a biblical realism that does not yet exist in the contested landscape. However, rather than producing an erasure of the Palestinian presence, and in contradiction to the professed desire to refrain from politics, I show that the very communicative situation and multiple framings for producing this biblical realism inevitably remind visitors of the contemporary context.

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Curating Conflict

Four Exhibitions on Jerusalem

Sa'ed Atshan and Katharina Galor

“The heritage of Jerusalem is indivisible, and each of its communities has a right to the explicit recognition of their history and relationship with the city. To deny, conceal or erase any of the Jewish, Christian, or Muslim traditions

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Intimidation, reassurance, and invisibility

Israeli security agents in the Old City of Jerusalem

Erella Grassiani and Lior Volinz

The Old city of Jerusalem is a place of extremes, where tourists and pilgrims come to see the sights and pray, but where violence is often just around the corner. As part of East Jerusalem, the square kilometer called the Old City is considered by

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Christian Pilgrimage Groups in Jerusalem

Framing the Experience Through Linear Meta-Narrative

Vida Bajc

Christian pilgrims come to the Holy Land to visit specific physical places that give their faith a tangible form. On organized tours, pilgrimage is structured through an itinerary which consists of a series of encounters, purposefully shaped to bring to life the story of Jesus. These encounters involve performative practices of tour-group leaders at specific symbolic sites with particular narratives. The biblical reality is invoked through a process of meta-framing which allows for a cognitive shift from the mundane walking from site to site into a biblical reality. Meta-framing interlaces the Christian religious memory, performed by the spiritual leader, with the Israeli historical memory, performed by the Israeli tour guide, into a single, linear meta-narrative.

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The Return to the Monument

The Looming Absence of the Temple

Hava Schwartz

Figure 2 Golden Menorah constructed by the Temple Institute, the Jewish Quarter, Jerusalem Photographs © Hava Schwartz The images of the Temple and the menorah are deeply embedded in Jewish art. The facade of the Temple and the shape of the menorah

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Hillel Cohen

for holiness, and this has been an important influence on both national societies and the relations between them. Regarding the connection between Palestinian nationalism and Jerusalem, I argue—following Rashid Khalidi (1997) and Haim Gerber (2008

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Gil Nativ

The three weeks known as Bein HaMeitzarim, twenty-one days between 17th of Tamuz and 9th of Av, are marked by abstaining from wedding ceremonies, dance-music, and for the more observant: no eating of meat or drinking wine, except on Shabbat. We read in Mishna, Ta'anit 4.6: 'Five things befell our ancestors on the 17th of Tamuz, and five on the 9th of Av'. The two lists of five things are somewhat symmetric: the first event in each list connects these two dates with mishaps during the first years of wandering in the Sinai desert, following the Exodus. The second and third items in each of these two lists connect the two dates with commemorating the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. Which of the two Temples: the first or the second? As for Tish'ah beAv this mishnah is clear: 'The Temple was destroyed the first time and the second time on this date', i.e. both Temples were destroyed on the same date in different centuries. There is a contradiction between the two Biblical reports, in Jeremiah 52:12 and in II Kings 25:8, concerning the First Temple.

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Zohar Segev

This article examines American Zionist leaders' positions on the Jerusalem issue, taking into consideration that from the 1920s until 1948, they acted within the Zionist movement as an independent political force that sought to play an active role in shaping the Yishuv and the State of Israel according to their own worldview. Their position on Jerusalem included recognition of its significance in Jewish history and the necessity of consolidating Jewish nationalism in Palestine. Yet they demonstrated a clear preference for social and economic patterns that, they maintained, had consolidated in Tel Aviv as a counterbalance to Jerusalem.

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Folding and Enfolding Walls

Statist Imperatives and Bureaucratic Aesthetics in Divided Jerusalem

Don Handelman

This article discusses one vector of statist control in present-day Jerusalem, a divided city that is held together primarily by the bureaucratic and military grip of the Israeli state. This vector is composed through the positioning of four architectural forms, the last three of which have, in particular, qualities of walls, but of walls that enfold. I refer to them as the 'museum-wall', the 'mall-wall', and the 'separation barrier'. These physical forms are brought into conjunction through the idea of vector, used loosely in a topological way (as distinct from topographical), in which value is carried (non-linearly) through space—that is, it is enhanced and made more powerful as it is shaped in its continuing. These walls capture and contain, folding into themselves that which they circumscribe and thereby recursively fortifying themselves.