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Laborers, Migrants, Refugees

Managing Belonging, Bodies, and Mobility in (Post)Colonial Kenya and Tanzania

Hanno Brankamp and Patricia Daley

neighboring countries, in particular Kenya and Tanzania. By 2000, Tanzania was hosting around 702,000 refugees and asylum seekers, while Kenya was home to over 219,000 ( UNHCR 2004 ). Since then, Kenya's refugee population has soared to 490,000, while 337

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“Money Is Life”

Quantity, Social Freedom, and Combinatory Practices in Western Kenya

Mario Schmidt

deliberately translate ethnographic data into formal language in order to be able to compare data across different social spheres (cf. Mitchell 1980 ). Taking into account that the validity of social encounters in Western Kenya is not a qualitative matter (who

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Impatient Accumulation, Immediate Consumption

Problems with Money and Hope in Central Kenya

Peter Lockwood

's own—a change of status, temporarily felt. ‘Comparison’ ( kwiganania ) implies envy, the desire to consume like others witnessed in the peri-urban milieu of central Kenya. Iregi's words describe the central theme I explore in this article—a sense of

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Moving Onward?

Secondary Movers on the Fringes of Refugee Mobility in Kakuma Refugee Camp, Kenya

Jolien Tegenbos and Karen Büscher

order to better understand the complexity of migrant experiences and conceptualize the “mixedness.” This article, with its analysis of the migration-asylum nexus in the setting of Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya, builds further on a continuing “plea” for a

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“Eyes, Ears, and Wheels”

Policing Partnerships in Nairobi, Kenya

Francesco Colona and Tessa Diphoorn

actors who are not (directly) encapsulated by the state, and in some cases, operate in a certain degree of isolation, away from state oversight and authority. Several studies based in Kenya (e.g., Anderson 2002 ; Rasmussen 2010 ; Ruteere and Pommerolle

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Distributing Responsibilities in an Agricultural Ecosystem

Insights from the Lake Naivasha Water Basin in Kenya

Gaële Rouillé-Kielo

This article explores the responses to acknowledged anthropogenic transformations of Lake Naivasha in Kenya, whose ecosystem is considered to have been disturbed by the intensification of agricultural uses of natural resources (notably land and water) over the last half century. It examines the ways in which a “payments for environmental services” (PES) project has been implemented, reflecting the rationale of ecological modernization. This article aims to challenge the environmental narrative that supports the project by revealing its oversimplifications. Empirical data demonstrates how the environmental issues addressed by the project are embedded in historically inherited land trajectories. This in turn forces us to reflect on the necessary question of responsibility, an issue at the heart of the debate since the emergence of the Anthropocene concept.

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The Weatherman

The Making of Prepared Farmers and the Postcolonial Predictive State in Kenya

Martin Skrydstrup

This article explores weather forecasting as an emergent technology of governmentality through a detailed ethnography of the ways in which the relationships between weather and crops are rendered knowable in a two-day “participatory scenario planning” (PSP) workshop in Naromoru in the Central Highlands of Kenya. Farmers were “made into meteorologists” and developed their preparedness for hazards, impacts, opportunities, strategies, and responsibilities within the context of facing El Niño. The ethnography targets seemingly novel ways of preparing farmers for El Niño. I argue that the PSP served two principal functions: (1) to redistribute responsibilities of the farmers themselves by making them into “meteorologists”; and (2) to integrate “scientific expertise” with “local knowledge” to generate public trust in the metrological institutions of the postcolonial predictive state.

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“The Dragon Can't Roar”

Analysis of British Expatriate Masculinity in Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many

Antony Mukasa Mate

Yusuf Dawood's One Life Too Many (1987) is a poignant exploration of the life of British expatriate Sydney Walker in colonial and postcolonial Kenya. The text epitomizes the nexus between power and masculinity through the rise and fall of the

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The “Moral Effect” of Legalized Lawlessness

Violence in Britain’s Twentieth-Century Empire

Caroline Elkins

Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya , he would have been aware of the systemized violence that Britain deployed during the Mau Mau Emergency in colonial Kenya. 12 He might also, at a minimum, have gestured to the connections between 1950s Kenya and other

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“Going vertical” in times of insecurity

Constructing proximity and distance through a Kenyan gated high-rise

Zoë Goodman

Security in Kenya and the rise of gated living Looking down at the Kenyan port of Mombasa from the rooftop of the Jaffery Complex, a high-rise gated compound whose residential towers now constitute the city's tallest buildings, I find it hard not to