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Neriko Musha Doerr

‘global learners’, make this apparent. Who are global learners? More importantly, who are not global learners? Who decides? What gives them the right to do so? Who is advantaged and who is marginalised in the process? What do we privilege and what do we

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Imagining oneself

Narrative evaluations of the professional identities of learners in a transnational higher-educational setting

Kevin Haines

This article uses a narrative approach to investigate the learning experiences of third-year medical students in a transnational higher educational setting, specifically during an elective period abroad. The students evaluate their learning experiences in an unfamiliar environment both in relation to previous learning and in relation to their possible or imagined future professional identities. Through this process, these students demonstrate how learning may take place through participation outside or alongside the formal curriculum, in the informal and the hidden curriculum (Leask and Bridge 2013). These narrative evaluations represent a reflective resource for the learners and their peers. They may also provide other stakeholders in transnational higher educational settings, including teachers, programme coordinators, educational managers and policy-makers, with an understanding of the experiences of mobile students in the informal curriculum.

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Elizabeth Chapman Hoult

This article explores the opportunities for resisting what Bourdieu and Passeron (1977) see as the reproductive nature of higher education. Originating in an empirical and theoretical study of resilient learners, this article inhabits an interdisciplinary space between Education and Literature. It seeks to read the exceptions to Bourdieu and Passeron's schema - what they call 'des miraculés' - openly and optimistically. A reading of Shakespeare's late play, The Winter's Tale, is offered in the light of two other texts - conclusions extrapolated from a range of data from the study, and Hélène Cixous's essay Sorties (1975/1986). As a result, the presumption that teaching and learning in the university is inevitably a self-centred and exclusive enterprise is challenged and an alternative way of thinking about pedagogy suggested.

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Holly Hansen-Thomas and Ludovic A. Sourdot

This article examines the severe educational crisis in the United States regarding the ability of institutions of higher education to recruit, retain and appropriately serve Latin@ English Language Learners (ELLs). In particular, it highlights the plight of undocumented ELLs who attend U.S. high schools and universities, but cannot work upon leaving higher education. This case study aims to describe the story, challenges and successes of one undocumented college graduate. In this study the authors show how cracks in the academic pipeline negatively affect Latin@ ELLs. This article offers specific recommendations to mend these cracks and improve the education opportunities of immigrant ELLs.

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Ad Fontes Digitales!?

Margins of Representation When Incorporating Medieval Sources into a German Digital History Textbook

Andreas Willershausen

mBook ). 3 Learners who struggle to grasp the meaning of the archaically formulated text after a first reading can, with a click of the mouse, open two simplified versions of the text. The first of these reads, “Someone who is uneducated and envies

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Becoming a global citizen?

Developing community-facing learning in the social sciences

Jane Booth

Education First Initiative ( Torres 2017 ). Educational establishments, as the educators of both citizens and the future workforce, were charged with the responsibility to enable learners ‘to work across social and cultural differences … to understand world

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Joseph Nelson

Michael Reichert and Richard Hawley. 2014. I Can Learn from You: Boys as Relational Learners. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press. 216 pp. ISBN: 9781612506647

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Interiority and government of the child

Transparency, risk, and good governance in Indonesia

Jan Newberry

political and economic changes in Indonesia, and indeed to pave the way for these early childhood programs aimed at producing not only healthier babies, but also the empowered, self-directed learner familiar in preschools in the developed North Atlantic. The

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Paul Sutton

The communicative relationship between learners and teachers in higher education, particularly as manifested in assessment and feedback, is often problematic. I begin from an Academic Literacies approach that positions academic literacy as requiring learners to acquire a complex set of literacy skills and abilities within specific discursive and institutional contexts. Whilst acknowledging the institutional dimension of academic literacy, I argue that the Academic Literacies approach tends to underestimate its significance. This shortcoming can be addressed by considering student speaking and writing as powerfully constrained by what Bourdieu refers to as the authority of pedagogic institutions, which function in what Sennett calls the culture of the new capitalism. Synthesising Bourdieu and Sennett, I argue, opens up possibilities for creating a pedagogy for itself: a pedagogy conscious of its reproductive function but able to provide both learners and teachers with what Canaan terms critical hope. Through this theoretical synthesis I seek to re-craft the Academic Literacies approach to pedagogic communication so that our understanding of the problems experienced by learners in acquiring academic literacy can be enhanced.

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Transformation and Continuity in Urban Space

The Smartphone as a Companion to Digital Teaching and Learning Processes in Extracurricular Learning Settings

Julian Zimmermann, Julian Happes, and Nadja Bergis

The progressive digitization of society is irreversibly changing education. Specialists in teaching methodologies are having to address questions raised by the digital revolution in schools and develop appropriate training for teachers. This article responds to this revolution by proposing that smartphones be used to support digital teaching and learning processes in extracurricular learning settings. Specifically, it presents digital city tours as potential tools designed to help learners to explore the urban space integral to their living environment, recognize its historical dimension, and work on this dimension by developing digital narratives. The smartphone is understood here as a tool that makes it possible for learners to experience history and that encourages them to develop learning skills.