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Joan Gross

Studying abroad can be a life-altering experience, but not necessarily. I credit the two study-abroad experiences I had as an undergraduate as setting my course as an anthropologist. At this stage in my career, having directed, taught and evaluated five study-abroad programmes in three different countries, I felt ready to create my own based on the pros and cons I had observed. In December 2013, I completed a pilot run of a binational learning community focused on food, culture and social justice in Ecuador and Oregon and would like to share the experience in order to encourage other higher education teachers to invent similar programmes. It is not an easy model to pull off, especially in a large state institution, but it achieved the kind of coherence that I have found lacking in other study-abroad programmes and was a very satisfying teaching/learning experience. I will outline some issues concerning study-abroad programmes and then describe

the programme I was involved in implementing in 2013.

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"Most of the People My Age Tend to Move Out"

Young Men Talking about Place, Community, and Belonging in Manchester

Khawla Badwan and Samantha Wilkinson

Universities are as a means of leaving for the city for young people living increasingly precarious and mobile lives. This article explores how male university students (aged 18–25) talk about, and belong to, the places they inhabit in Greater Manchester, England. Drawing on mixed-methods data collection from survey responses and in-depth semi-structured interviews, this article finds that while young men embrace liquid understandings of place, they express tensions between “insiders” and “outsiders.” While universities appear to be significant places for male university students, only half the participants reported feelings of belonging to university communities. Consequently, this article proposes recommendations for universities, in order to ensure male university students feel they can open up to staff, thereby enabling them to feel part of a “learning community”—a key theme of the National Student Survey.

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Museum Mediators in Europe

Connecting Learning in a Field of Experience

Alice Semedo

Learning networks do not arise from nothing. They are born out of personal connections, exchanged conversations, constructed spaces, and shared visions. Other broader contexts (e.g., the theoretical contexts or funding policies available within a globalized economy) are also part of this landscape. The Museum Mediators in Europe course is one of such learning networks that came to be in 2013 with the aim of representing institutional and professional needs of mediation professionals in the European countries involved in this project: Portugal, Spain, Italy, Denmark, and Estonia. The project argues that a clearly defined set of best practices in museum education is called for and that leadership/mentoring programs for museum mediators should be utilized to foster professional learning communities within museums.

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Marcela Vásquez-León, Brian Burke, and Lucero Radonic

A critical interest of applied anthropology is to educate students to be theoretically grounded and capable of assuming a level of social responsibility that extends beyond academia. In this paper, we reflect on the issue of student preparation for work in the policy arena by focusing on the experiences of a five-year applied research project that examines agricultural cooperatives as situated agents of change and grassroots development. The project has completed three field seasons in Brazil and Paraguay in which student researchers, including anthropology graduate students from the University of Arizona and in-country undergraduate students from partner universities, have been an integral part. The paper focuses on strategies developed in the research process that enhance student learning. Community Based Research, learning to work through research teams, and creating community-university partnerships constitute the bases of a project that emphasises student learning in the process of doing research and forming collaborations.

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Learning for citizenship online

How can students develop intercultural awareness and construct knowledge together?

Hugh Starkey and Nicola Savvides

This article evaluates ways in which students on an online Master's programme are learning about citizenship and developing intercultural awareness in spite of the lack of face-to-face interaction. There is still debate about the effectiveness of online courses and whether they provide an adequate substitute for, or even an improvement on, classroom-based learning. We employ qualitative research methods and deploy instruments for analysing constructivist learning to evaluate the extent to which students are constructing knowledge through online discussions as well as learning from research-led teaching materials. We also analyse online discussions for evidence of social presence, including the interventions of the course tutor. We conclude that students do feel themselves to be members of an international learning community and that their interactions can promote higher-order learning. We draw attention to some advantages of online courses such as the possibility of crafting a contribution and the availability of discussions as a resource.

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Penny Welch and Susan Wright

interventions to understand and rectify the problem. This process culminated in the introduction of a guided fieldwork model based on building an online learning community mentored by PhD students. During their semester of fieldwork, students complete a series

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Hans Karl Peterlini and Mary Brydon-Miller

introductory chapter, written by the editors, lays out the challenges involved in teaching and learning community-based research (CBR). They bring many years of combined experience to this work and provide a helpful history and framing of CBR, in particular

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Enacting inclusivity in the preparation of emerging scholars

A response to programme reform in higher education

Saran Stewart, Chayla Haynes, and Kristin Deal

and unfavourable in the facilitation my own learning by concluding, ‘Our collective success as educators is dependent on each person's willingness to participate fully in the learning process, commitment to creating learning communities that foster

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Sarah Amsler

’ by creating counter-hegemonic (and increasingly criminalised) learning communities within the institutions, and make specific demands for universities to democratise governance, offer fair employment contracts, disinvest from global conflict and

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Critical pedagogy and Socially Responsible Investing (SRI)

Questioning our post-secondary institutions’ investment strategies

David P. Thomas

learning, and using self-paced and/or cooperative (team-based) learning’ ( 1996: 43 ). This approach literally transfers power and authority from the instructor to the students in ways that enable them to establish a learning community where the instructor