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Julie Van der Wielen

Sartre's analysis of intersubjective relations through his concept of the look seems unable to give an account of intersubjectivity. By distinguishing the look as an ontological conflict from our relation with others in experience, we will see that actually intersubjectivity is not incompatible with this theory. Furthermore, we will see that the ontological conflict with the Other always erupts in experience in the form of an emotion, and thus always involves magic, and we will look into what the presence of the Other adds to such emotion. Emotions I have in front of the Other are directed toward my being-for-others, which escapes me by definition. This has a peculiar consequence when the imaginary is involved, which could help explain complexes such as narcissism and paranoia.

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Sarah E. Whitney

, received widespread acclaim. To date, Dias’s project has resulted in the worldwide distribution of over 9,000 volumes of children’s literature. 1 Marley Dias’s activism exemplifies Black Girl Magic, a mediated discourse affirming African-American girls

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Daniel O'Shiel

Sartrean conceptions of the Ego, emotions, language, and the imaginary provide a comprehensive account of "magic" that could ultimately give rise to a new philosophical psychology. By focusing upon only one of these here—the imaginary—we see that through its irrealizing capabilities consciousness contaminates the world and bewitches itself in a manner that defies simple deterministic explication. We highlight this with an explication of what Sartre means by "nihilation" and the "analogon," and introduce a concrete example of nostalgia, hoping to lay the scene for a detailed study into the dynamic between our ontological freedom and its constitution and experience of phenomena as enchanting and bewitching. "Magical being" must therefore involve a deep, Sartrean analysis that explicates ontological freedom as becoming concretely engaged in both the real and irreal alike, whereby the imaginary as magic can lead to the most insane, as well as the most artistic, incantations.

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Tangki War Magic

The Virtuality of Spirit Warfare and the Actuality of Peace

Margaret Chan

Tangki spirit-medium worship is practiced in the Hokkien communities of Southeast Asia and Taiwan. Tangkis are exorcists who perform war magic using the ritual theater of self-mortification. A tangki pierces his body with rods and swords in order to be supercharged with the spirit-power of the weapons for the battle with evil. Self-mortification can also enact a bodhisattva sacrifice of the body on behalf of devotees. The virtuality of the ritual theater convinces believers of the actuality of exorcism, which will ensure peace and safety in the reality of the everyday.

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The Magic of Bureaucracy

Repatriation as Ceremony

Laura Peers

magic of bureaucracy that ultimately effects the repatriation. Repatriation is a series of performances, formal institutional and cultural rituals, that articulate and reinforce, as well as challenge, identities and relations of power. Museums, as

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Iain Sinclair

Warfare was widespread in classical India. Although the Buddhists of India abhorred killing, they could not evade or ignore war altogether. From the seventh century to the thirteenth century, various types of war magic, together with justifications for their use, developed in tantric Buddhist communities. Defensive types of war magic adhered to pacifist ethics and aimed to avoid, halt, or disperse armies. Harmful war magic was applied in the context of the transcendent ethics of enlightenment. Even when warfare was fully incorporated into Buddhist soteriology, non-violence remained a paramount virtue, and the scope of a just war was very limited. The present survey of tantric sources shows that tantric Buddhist war magic emerged as a reaction to the inevitability of war and was applied in the hope of mitigating warfare's excesses.

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Anna Cento Bull

This chapter examines the consequences of the financial scandal that engulfed the Northern League's inner circle—the so-called Magic Circle—made up of the party's leader Umberto Bossi, his family, and their most trusted friends. At the political level, the scandal brought to the fore a fight for the party's leadership, pitting Bossi against Roberto Maroni, the former minister of the interior, which ended with a clear victory for Maroni. At the electoral level, the party suffered a heavy defeat in the May 2012 local administrative elections, despite its opposition to the austerity measures introduced by the new Monti government. This chapter analyzes the significance of Maroni's victory in terms of the League's political style and policies. It also addresses the question of whether this party can once again reinvent itself and regain the support of the electorate in the North.

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Francisca Lladó

Palace of Naples, making modern-day photographs look like seventeenth-century engravings. In this way, he locates the events, although fictitious, at a specific time in the past. Given the hostility and magic apparent in the stories referred to above

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'The Magic Circle'

Women and Community Formation of a Frontier Village in Caroline Kirkland's New Home – Who'll Follow?

Ana-Isabel Aliaga-Buchenau

With these seemingly apologetic words, Caroline Kirkland initiates her narrative New Home – Who’ll Follow? (1839) about life in a village on the Michigan frontier in the 1830s. However, ‘the common- place occurrences’ and the ‘gossip about every-day people’ that Kirkland describes are an important contribution to American literature. In 1846, Edgar Allen Poe went so far as to say that her book was an ‘undoubted sensation’. Kirkland writes about one particular aspect of the American experience – life on the frontier. While many authors of the time have tackled this particular American topic, Kirkland carves out a niche for her work by claiming to tell the truth. Her contemporaries and modern scholars alike praised her descriptions of frontier life for the realistic detail which critics found rare in an age of sentimental romances or tall-tale adventure stories about the West.

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Lior Levy

The article advances an interpretation of the self as an imaginary object. Focusing on the relationship between selfhood and memory in Sartre's The Transcendence of the Ego, I argue that Sartre offers useful resources for thinking about the self in terms of narratives. Against interpretations that hold that the ego misrepresents consciousness or distorts it, I argue that the constitution of the ego marks a radical transformation of the conscious field. To prove this point, I turn to the role of reflection and memory in the creation of the self. Reflection and memory weave past, present and future into a consistent and meaningful life story. This story is no other than the self. I propose to understand the self as a fictional or imaginary entity, albeit one that has real presence in human life.