Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 33 items for :

  • "MELANCHOLIA" x
  • All content x
Clear All
Restricted access

John Clarke

This article examines the modernisation of universities in the U.K., arguing that heterogeneous policy objectives and strategies have become condensed in the construction of higher education as a governable system and the university as a corporate enterprise. It argues that managerialism has displaced and subordinated professional and administrative logics for the coordination of universities, articulating them into supporting roles. Finally, it examines some of the cultural psychological states associated with the contradictory and uncomfortable assemblage that is the modernized university: identifying fantasy, dissociation and professional melancholia. It concludes with an argument that nostalgia for a lost academic community cannot be a foundation for political challenges to the present model.

Restricted access

Martin Ashley

This article explores the existential status of ten to fourteen year old boys through a full time, research council funded study of young masculinity and voice. Drawing on the ideas of writers who have suggested this period can be a melancholic one, the article interprets qualitative data derived from boy singers and “peer audience” groups in schools. It is found that the voice does contribute to existential difficulties for boys concerned as much about being “not child” as “not girl” but unable to attain adult masculinity. The period is one of great cultural difficulty for young males and many avoid the issues. Yet the boys who enjoyed using their voices were the less prone to melancholia.

Restricted access

Cam Clayton

In this paper, I argue that temporality, as described in Being and Nothingness, is a central theme in Nausea. In the first section I make the point that one of Sartre's guiding concerns at the time of publishing Nausea is temporality and the temporal nature of freedom. In the second section, the theme of melancholy and its relationship to temporality is explored. The third section explores Sartre's use of this image of being taken 'from behind'. I use this temporal imagery as a guide for interpreting Roquentin's reaction to the rape and murder of Lucienne. By interpreting this scene by way of the temporality of Being and Nothingness, we can duly recognize the early Sartre's concern with temporality, understand the melancholia that arises because of the 'internal' negation of the past, and give a more satisfying account of a scene which is often ignored in the secondary literature.

Restricted access

Between Trauma and Healing

Tourism and Neoliberal Peace-Building in Divided Societies

John Nagle

Deeply divided societies that have undergone extreme civil violence are often framed as "collectively traumatized" or in a state of "melancholia." Such aetiologies support peace-building initiatives, which seek either to normalize society by forgetting the legacy of violence and starting anew or by engendering societal remembering to work through trauma and bring about societal healing and eventual "closure." Examining the case of Northern Ireland, this article considers how these discrepant processes regarding collective trauma have become bound with fierce ethnopolitical debates and counter-insurgency methods regarding how to promote the region to tourists. I argue that both approaches represent nostrums, which do little to support peace-building and are ultimately complementary with neoliberal designs concerning the relationship among tourism, economic prosperity and conflict-regulation. Discourses concerning "collective trauma" must therefore be viewed as political strategies to shape the nation, which are finally embodied in the tourist journey to "traumatized sites."

Free access

Introduction

Engaging Anthropological Legacies toward Cosmo-optimistic Futures?

Sharon Macdonald, Henrietta Lidchi, and Margareta von Oswald

In a book published as After Empire (2004a) in the United Kingdom and Postcolonial Melancholia (2004b) in the United States, Paul Gilroy argues that convivial culture—including cosmopolitanism—can offer an alternative to the anxiety and fear of

Restricted access

Introduction

The Presence of the Past in the Era of the Nation-State

Nicolas Argenti

melancholia ( Navaro-Yashin 2012 ). Not amenable to the progressivist unilinear temporalities of the post-Ottoman state, this melancholic legacy keeps watch over silenced memories of pluralist ideologies that remain alien to the ethno-nationalist project. In

Restricted access

Hamlet’s Catch-22

A Psychoanalytic Reading of Hamlet and Catch-22

Bahareh Azad and Pyeaam Abbasi

the loss of a loved person, or to the loss of some abstraction which has taken the place of one, such as one’s country, liberty, and ideal’ can be ‘normal’ mourning or ‘pathological’ melancholia. 55 Snowden’s ghostly presence, Yossarian’s gunner who

Restricted access

Making Sense of the Remote Areas

Films and Stories from a Tundra Village

Petia Mankova

constructions in the imaginary worlds of the mediascape. They belong neither to the film directors as individuals nor to the place. The remote places hold elements of “spatial melancholia.” Asking whether melancholy emerges from the self or from the setting

Restricted access

Green Fields and Blue Roads

The Melancholy of the Girl Walker in Irish Women’s Fiction

Maureen O’Connor

. In both cases, the girl-heroes effect a transmutation of their experience, and use melancholy, as Kristeva suggests artists do, as a source of creative inspiration. Morton argues that ‘melancholia is an ethical act of absolute refusal’, 38 part of

Free access

Rachel J. Wilde, Gayle Clifford, Áron Bakos, and Kristine Hickle

with a critical eye may help combat what Clarke terms ‘professional melancholia’ (144) and the daily, individual frustrations of such changes to academic working to enable us, as a collective, to imagine alternatives. Davis provides a strikingly