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John Clarke

This article examines the modernisation of universities in the U.K., arguing that heterogeneous policy objectives and strategies have become condensed in the construction of higher education as a governable system and the university as a corporate enterprise. It argues that managerialism has displaced and subordinated professional and administrative logics for the coordination of universities, articulating them into supporting roles. Finally, it examines some of the cultural psychological states associated with the contradictory and uncomfortable assemblage that is the modernized university: identifying fantasy, dissociation and professional melancholia. It concludes with an argument that nostalgia for a lost academic community cannot be a foundation for political challenges to the present model.

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Kenneth Christie

The emergence of an ‘Asian’ form of democracy in distinction to a liberal Western one has called into question longstanding assumptions that economic development leads to democracy, which was a mainstay of modernisation theory from the early 1960s to the present day (i.e. Lipset 1959; Diamond 1992).2 This article will examine some of the assumptions behind Asian democracy (sometimes called ‘illiberal democracy’), its relationship with economic development and the difficulties and tensions between these propositions in Southeast Asia in relation to modernisation and political change.

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Modernising Pastorals?

The Olive Field and Thirties Leftist Pastoral

Chris Hopkins

William Empson famously suggested in his book Some Versions of Pastoral (1935) that ‘good proletarian art is usually Covert Pastoral’.1 This comment, and the discussion which follows it, has a good deal of characteristic Empsonian provocation and idiosyncrasy, and has rarely been pursued with seriousness by 1930s critics. Thus Valentine Cunningham says that this ‘cheeky dodge’ of Empson’s is at least half-serious, but is more inclined to emphasise the playful half of the intention

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Modernisation and Social Change

The Impact on Iranian Elderly Social Networks and Care Systems

Mary Elaine Hegland, Zahra Sarraf, and Mohammad Shahbazi

Anthropological field research in Iran, mainly in the village of Aliabad and in nearby Shiraz in south-west Iran, has documented radical social, cultural, religious and economic change over the last 28 years. Increasing emphasis on the nuclear rather than the extended family and pressures for geographic and social mobility have profoundly influenced the lives of the elderly. The traditional family system of support for elders - with regard to emotional and social needs, as well as financial assistance and physical care - is breaking down. Social scientists, social workers and health personnel must focus on adequately addressing the needs and concerns of the Iranian elderly in the twenty-first century and on developing alternative systems to deal with key elderly issues of health, well-being and social incorporation.

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The Third Sector and the Process of Modernisation

Reflections on the Perspectives of NGOs in the Process of European Intregration

Peter Herrmann

The perception by the public, politicians or academics of the role of NGOs with regard to social policy in general, and social quality in particular, is often incoherent. Although these organisations are widely appreciated and supported, there are no clear views on their often contradictory role in the democratic process, and they are defined in narrow, yet widely differing ways. NGOs are usually not addressed in the analysis of broader approaches of social-policy arrangements, and their study is mainly concerned with organisational perspectives, sometimes viewing them as economic entities rather than as social actors. NGOs have also been largely ignored in the analysis of social quality. This is clearly shown in the first publications to come out of the 'Social Quality Initiative', in which most of the contributions fail to regard NGOs as a specific subject, and the few which do mostly look at organisational issues.

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Maria Vassilikou

In August 1946, the Board of Deputies of British Jews received a report about the situation of the Jewish cemetery of Salonika, the city which only three years ago had witnessed the destruction by the Germans of one of the most glorious Jewish communities of the Balkans. This detailed report aimed at summoning support for the protection of what was left of the ancient Jewish burial ground.

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Fresh off the Boat and Off to the Presses

The Origins of Argentine Comics between the United States and Europe (1907–1945)

Amadeo Gandolfo and Pablo Turnes

device that Outcault had promoted: the speech balloon. At the time, Argentina was experiencing an era of aggressive modernisation and enormous growth. Sparked by the agro-export model, based on the export of enormous quantities of meat and grain to

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The Fate of 'Backwardness'

Portuguese Expectations over Modernisation

Catarina Frois

In Portugal, terms such as 'modernisation', 'progress' and 'development' are continually invoked by a wide range of social actors, representing the right path and ultimate goal of all political and social change, but on the other hand conceal the actual truth that, to use Latour's expression: 'We have never been modern'. The result is that the demand for modernisation is accompanied by the parallel reification of 'backwardness'. Alluding to Portugal's peripheral condition, to its distance from the rest of Europe and so forth, is part of common everyday discourse, and the country is typically portrayed as a kind of European backwater, forever lagging behind more advanced states. This article aims to present and discuss how backwardness and modernisation are recurrently present in political discourse as a leitmotiv for social, economic and cultural change and the way it is incorporated into a broader and rooted self-representation of the Portuguese modus vivendi and national features.

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Alan Harding, Alan Scott, Stephan Laske & Christian Burtscher (eds) (2007) Bright Satanic Mills: Universities, Regional Development and the Knowledge Economy

Review by Paul Benneworth

Christophe Charle & Charles Soulié (eds) (2007) Les ravages de la ‘modernisation’ universitaire en Europe

Review by Annika Rabo

Paul Ramsden (1998) Learning to Lead in Higher Education

Review by Melissa Shaw

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High-tech Romania?

Commoditisation and Informal Relations in the Managerialist Informatisation of the Romanian Health-Care System

Sabina Stan and Valentin-Veron Toma

While informatisation has officially been hailed as a major component of the modernisation of the Romanian health-care system, this paper, based on ethnographic research in Romanian hospitals, shows that it has been mostly geared towards managerialist goals of administrative control and cost containment. Paradoxically, informal relations, which were supposed to be suppressed as a result of both informatisation and managerialist marketisation, continue to thrive in the Romanian health-care system.