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Unpacking the Museum Register

Institutional Memories of the Potlatch Collection Repatriation

Emma Knight

, rattles, whistles, and coppers, were confiscated from the Cape Mudge Weḵa’yi, Village Island Mamalilikulla, and Alert Bay ’Na̱mǥis. 1 The collection was intended for the Victoria Memorial Museum—now the Canadian Museum of History (CMH)—in Ottawa; however

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Representing Wildlife Management: Sustainable Hunting Narratives at the International Wildlife Museum

Nels Paulson

Hunting is an important basis for conservation, but hunters are surprisingly scarce in global networks of environmental advocacy and governance, and hunting management systems are not given the attention they should receive. This article reveals the messages promoted by hunting advocates through an analysis of museum representations and interviews in order to understand the limitations of and basis upon which further integration of hunters into conservation advocacy circles worldwide could occur. Museums feature representations that reflect the cultural elucidations of their host organization. This article will show how the International Wildlife Museum—maintained by Safari Club International—produces messages of the inseparability of humans from nature, purposive management of nature, dependence upon global capitalism and predation, and the neutrality of scientific knowledge. Through these messages a narrative space for the management of wildlife is produced that attempts to unite the commodification and conservation of nature, namely, “sustainable hunting”. This article concludes by identifying contradictions among the messages of sustainable hunting that may limit hunting advocates' ability to work with other stakeholders to further improve hunting management systems.

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The Future of Museums

Recover and Reimagine (A Conversation)

Craig Barker, Helena Robinson, James L. Flexner, Anna Lawrenson, and Alex Burchmore

The following conversation took place on 18 May 2021 during a panel discussion to coincide with marking the six months since the opening of the Chau Chak Wing Museum at the University of Sydney, along with the annual occurrence of International

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Museums in the Pandemic

A Survey of Responses on the Current Crisis

Joanna Cobley, David Gaimster, Stephanie So, Ken Gorbey, Ken Arnold, Dominique Poulot, Bruno Brulon Soares, Nuala Morse, Laura Osorio Sunnucks, María de las Mercedes Martínez Milantchí, Alberto Serrano, Erica Lehrer, Shelley Ruth Butler, Nicky Levell, Anthony Shelton, Da (Linda) Kong, and Mingyuan Jiang

's well-being was mindboggling. Around the globe museums, galleries, and popular world heritage sites closed ( Associated Press 2020 ). The Smithsonian Magazine reported that all 19 institutes, including the National Zoo and the National Museum of the

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Border Violence, Democracy, and the Museum

Simon Knell

In 2018, the Higgins—a large, modern, multidisciplinary, town museum and art gallery in Bedford in the English Midlands—was one of several institutions in Britain to commemorate the seventieth anniversary of the first arrival of Caribbean migrants

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The Jewish Museum of Greece

Brief Description, Mission, Issues and Programmes

Zanet Battinou

The Jewish Museum of Greece was founded in Athens in 1977 to house a small number of artefacts, sad remnants from the Greek Jewish Communities, which unlike their owners survived the destruction of the Holocaust. In 1997 the Jewish Museum left its long-time home, on 36 Amalias Avenue, and moved into its own premises, a restored neo-classical building on 39 Nikis Street. On 10 March 1998, the official inauguration of the museum took place, marking a new era for this historical and ethnographical institution, dedicated to preserve, study and present historical, cultural and material evidence of 2,300 years of Jewish life in Greece.

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The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki

Museo Djidio di Salonik

Nicholas Stavroulakis

The Jewish Museum of Thessaloniki (Salonika) has had an interesting history of experimentation determined to a great degree by the horrific effects of the Shoah on the Jewish community of the city. A museum, somewhat by definition, is a place where memories are stored, where tangible evidence provides witness to events and persons and the communities in which they lived and functioned. In this regard a museum is somewhat introverted and self-centred though at the same time it can create the sense of continuity and identity that are required in order to evolve healthy lives. The very tangible presence of the Shoah was envisaged as a potential danger to a museum dedicated to a very long and august history of Jewish creativity.

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Collecting Communism: Private Museums of Everyday Life under Socialism in Former East Germany

Jonathan Bach

Across former East Germany today there are more than two dozen private museums devoted to representing everyday life under socialism. Some are haphazard collections in cramped spaces, others marketable mainstays of their local tourist economy. Historians have criticized them as at best amateurish and, at worst, a trivialization of the GDR's repressive practices. Yet, this article argues how, as a social phenomenon, these museums form an important early phase in postunification efforts by public cultural institutions to incorporate the GDR everyday into working through the past. The article examines the museum's modes of representation and shows how the museums lay claim to authenticity through a tactile, interactive, and informal approach. Despite valid criticisms, the article argues that the museums can be seen as helping overcome, rather than reinforce, the binary of totalitarianism and everyday life as antagonistic frameworks for understanding the socialist past.

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The Jewish Museum of Switzerland

Nadia Guth Biasini and Heidi Brunnschweiler

In the vicinity of the synagogue and the Jewish community of Basel and close to the city-centre, the first Jewish Museum of Switzerland (JMS) opened its doors in June 1966. The new museum, which had been set up according to the topical requirements of the museums of the time, and comprised a collection of remarkable objects, textiles, books, and documents, was very well received by newspapers and the public. In the first years about 3,000 visitors came to see the new structure. By now the number of visitors reaches about 5,000 a year, which does not include special events like the ‘Museumsnacht’ in January, which in 2003 drew 2,600 visitors to the museum within a few hours. In summer 2003 the temporary show of a collection of ketubbot from Italy (Braginsky Collection Zürich) was on display.

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The Jewish secOnd generation art & family Museum Amsterdam

The Creation Story of JOMA

Maarten K. van der Heijden

-century centre of Amsterdam. The JOMA combines my artwork with the eight fairly factual but rather fragmentary family stories I have been telling in secondary schools since 2015, in collaboration with Camp Westerbork Memorial Centre. The museum also has an